Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A pile of earth, gravel, sand, rocks, or debris heaped for protection or concealment.
  • n. A natural elevation, such as a small hill.
  • n. A raised mass, as of hay; a heap. See Synonyms at heap.
  • n. Archaeology A large artificial pile of earth or stones often marking a burial site.
  • n. Baseball The slightly elevated pitcher's area in the center of the diamond.
  • n. Archaic A hedge or fence.
  • transitive v. To fortify or conceal with a mound.
  • transitive v. To heap into a raised mass.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A hand.
  • n. A protection; restraint; curb.
  • n. A helmet.
  • n. Might; size.
  • n. An artificial hill or elevation of earth; a raised bank; an embankment thrown up for defense; a bulwark; a rampart.
  • n. A natural elevation appearing as if thrown up artificially; a regular and isolated hill, hillock, or knoll.
  • n. Elevated area of dirt upon which the pitcher stands to pitch.
  • n. A ball or globe forming part of the regalia of an emperor or other sovereign. It is encircled with bands, enriched with precious stones, and surmounted with a cross.
  • n. Vulva.
  • v. To fortify with a mound; add a barrier, rampart, etc. to.
  • v. To force or pile into a mound or mounds.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A ball or globe forming part of the regalia of an emperor or other sovereign. It is encircled with bands, enriched with precious stones, and surmounted with a cross; -- called also globe.
  • n. An artificial hill or elevation of earth; a raised bank; an embarkment thrown up for defense; a bulwark; a rampart; also, a natural elevation appearing as if thrown up artificially; a regular and isolated hill, hillock, or knoll.
  • transitive v. To fortify or inclose with a mound.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A protection; restraint; curb.
  • n. A helmet.
  • n. Might; size.
  • n. An artificial elevation of earth, as one raised as a fortification or part of a fortification, or as a funeral monument; a bank of earth; hence, a bulwark; a rampart or fence.
  • n. A natural elevation presenting the appearance of having been raised artificially; a hillock; a knoll.
  • n. In civil engine., in excavations, a piece of the original ground left at intervals to show the depth.
  • To fortify with a mound; add a barrier, rampart, etc., to.
  • n. A figure of a globe, taken as an emblem of sovereignty.
  • To form into mounds; become piled up into mounds.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. structure consisting of an artificial heap or bank usually of earth or stones
  • n. a small natural hill
  • n. (baseball) the slight elevation on which the pitcher stands
  • v. form into a rounded elevation
  • n. the position on a baseball team of the player who throws the ball for a batter to try to hit
  • n. a collection of objects laid on top of each other

Etymologies

Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From earlier meaning "hedge, fence", from Middle English mound, mund ("protection, boundary, raised earthen rampart"), from Old English mund ("hand, hand of protection, protector, guardianship"), from Proto-Germanic *mundō (“hand”), *munduz (“protection, patron”), from Proto-Indo-European *men-, *man-, *mar- (“hand”). Cognate with Old Frisian mund ("guardianship"), Old High German munt ("hand, protection") (German Mündel ("ward"), Vormund ("a guardian")), Old Norse mund (Icelandic mund, "hand")), Middle Dutch mond ("protection"), Latin manus ("hand"), Ancient Greek μάρη (márē, "hand"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This page unsportingly suggests that the mound is a 13th-century motte which had nothing to do with Pepin, but I'll take my romance where I can find it, thanks.

    Dental development

  • Manuel said he didn't use his best pinch-hitter, lefty Greg Dobbs, because Feliz "is a down hitter, and the guy on the mound is a sinkerball pitcher."

    Phillies win chess match in resumption of Game 5

  • "When you get ripped by your manager like we did, the best guy you can have on the mound is a dominating lefthander and he stepped up for us today," Flaherty said.

    USATODAY.com

  • The average brush turkey mound is 4 meters in diameter and a meter high; it comprises between 2 and 4 tons of material; and it takes up to six weeks to build.

    Archive 2007-01-01

  • Rays designated hitter Jonny Gomes charged the mound from the dugout, jumped on Navarro and Crisp, and threw several punches that hit Crisp while he was on the ground.

    USATODAY.com

  • BARTON: Today we voted to add the word mound to a national Indian monument in Georgia.

    CNN Transcript Dec 9, 2009

  • Carl Lumholtz describes three yácatas which he saw in the Sierra de los Tarascos: The mound is built of stones, without mortar, in the shape of a 'T, 'each arm about 50 feet long and thirty-two feet high.

    The Tarasco culture and empire

  • "My thought process on the mound is that I can't control anything that goes on except what I do, and that's make pitches," Carpenter said.

    USATODAY.com

  • Because the softball mound is so much closer to home plate than in the major leagues, Finch's pitches seem like they're whizzing by at 98 mph to baseball big-leaguers.

    USATODAY.com - Softball's Jennie Finch ready to make her pitch

  • To throw a 4-spot on the board with Greg Maddux on the mound is good enough for the game.

    USATODAY.com

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