Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An excavation for the interment of a corpse.
  • n. A place of burial.
  • n. Death or extinction: faced the grave with calm resignation.
  • adj. Requiring serious thought; momentous: a grave decision in a time of crisis.
  • adj. Fraught with danger or harm: a grave wound.
  • adj. Dignified and somber in conduct or character: a grave procession. See Synonyms at serious.
  • adj. Somber or dark in hue.
  • adj. Linguistics Written with or modified by the mark ( ` ), as the è in Sèvres.
  • adj. Linguistics Of or referring to a phonetic feature that distinguishes sounds produced at the periphery of the vocal tract, as in labial and velar consonants and back vowels.
  • n. Linguistics A mark ( ` ) indicating a pronounced e for the sake of meter in the usually nonsyllabic ending -ed in English poetry.
  • transitive v. To sculpt or carve; engrave.
  • transitive v. To stamp or impress deeply; fix permanently.
  • transitive v. To clean and coat (the bottom of a wooden ship) with pitch.
  • adv. Music In a slow and solemn manner. Used chiefly as a direction.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A written accent used in French, Italian, and other languages. è is an e with a grave accent.
  • n. An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher.
  • n. death, destruction.
  • v. To dig.
  • v. To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave.
  • v. To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture; as, to grave an image.
  • v. To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly.
  • v. To entomb; to bury.
  • v. To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch — so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.
  • v. To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch; -- so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.
  • adj. Of great weight; heavy; ponderous.
  • adj. Of importance; momentous; weighty; influential; sedate; serious; -- said of character, relations, etc.
  • adj. Not light or gay; solemn; sober; plain.
  • adj.
  • adj. Not acute or sharp; low; deep; -- said of sound.
  • adj. Slow and solemn in movement.
  • transitive v. To dig. [Obs.] Chaucer.
  • transitive v. To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave.
  • transitive v. To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture.
  • transitive v. To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly.
  • transitive v. To entomb; to bury.
  • intransitive v. To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.
  • n. An excavation in the earth as a place of burial; also, any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher. Hence: Death; destruction.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To dig; delve.
  • . To bury; entomb.
  • To cut or incise, as letters or figures, on stone or other hard substance with an edged or pointed tool; engrave.
  • To carve; sculpture; form or shape by cutting with a tool: as, to grave an image.
  • . To make an impression upon; impress deeply.
  • n. An excavation in the earth, now especially one in which a dead body is or is to be buried: a place for the interment of a corpse; hence, a tomb; a sepulcher.
  • n. Figuratively, any scene or occasion of utter loss, extinction, or disappearance: as, speculation is the grave of many fortunes.
  • n. Sometimes, in the authorized version of the Old Testament, the abode of the dead; Hades.
  • . Having weight; heavy; ponderous.
  • Solemn; sober; serious: opposed to light or jovial: as, a man of a grave deportment.
  • Plain; not gay or showy: as, grave colors.
  • Important; momentous; weighty; having serious import.
  • In acoustics, deep; low in pitch: opposed to acute.
  • n. The grave accent; also, the sign of the grave accent (`).
  • In music, to render grave, as a note or tone.
  • To clean (a ship's bottom) by burning or scraping off seaweeds, barnacles, etc., and paying it over with pitch.
  • n. A count; a prefect: in Germany and the Low Countries— formerly, a person holding some executive or judicial office: usually in composition with a distinctive term, as landgrave, margrave (*mark-grave), burgrave (*burg-grave), dike-grave, etc.; now merely a title of rank or honor.
  • In music, slow; solemn: noting passages to be so rendered.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. carve, cut, or etch into a material or surface
  • adj. of great gravity or crucial import; requiring serious thought
  • adj. dignified and somber in manner or character and committed to keeping promises
  • n. a mark (`) placed above a vowel to indicate pronunciation
  • n. a place for the burial of a corpse (especially beneath the ground and marked by a tombstone)
  • n. death of a person
  • adj. causing fear or anxiety by threatening great harm
  • v. shape (a material like stone or wood) by whittling away at it

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English græf; see ghrebh-2 in Indo-European roots.
French, from Old French, from Latin gravis; see gwerə-1 in Indo-European roots.
Middle English graven, from Old English grafan; see ghrebh-2 in Indo-European roots.
Middle English graven.
Italian, from Latin gravis, heavy; see grave2.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French grave, from Latin gravis ("heavy, important"). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English grave, grafe, from Old English græf ("cave, grave, trench"), from Proto-Germanic *graban, *grabō (“grave, trench, ditch”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- (“to dig, scratch, scrape”). Cognate with Dutch graf ("a grave"), Low German graf ("a grave"), German Grab ("a grave"), Swedish grav ("a grave"), Icelandic gröf ("a grave"). Cognate to Albanian gropë ("a ditch, hole"). Related to groove. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English graven, from Old English grafan ("to dig, dig up, grave, engrave, carve, chisel"), from Proto-Germanic *grabanan (“to dig”), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- (“to dig, scratch, scrape”). Cognate with Dutch graven ("to dig"), German graben ("to dig"), Swedish gräva ("to dig"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • And when he has tracked and dogged a man to his mother's grave -- _his mother's grave_ -- he can dine, he can laugh, he can go to the theatre!

    The Eternal City

  • Your temperate drinker treads on slippery ground; for as I verily believe that alcohol is one of the most active imps for the destruction of both body and soul, the temperate drinker is too often gradually led on by the fiend, until the habit becomes fixed and inveterate; and he drags a galling chain, each day riveted more strongly, and the poor wretch hourly becomes more callous to shame, until he sinks into the grave -- _the drunkard's grave_.

    Select Temperance Tracts

  • Jack watched him from his place by the window, his expression grave but cautious.

    Earl of Durkness

  • All, that is, with the exception of Spock, who nevertheless rose, hands clasped behind his back, his expression grave but managing nevertheless to convey the fact that, although he did not follow the custom, he agreed with the sentiment.

    The Three-Minute Universe

  • For Lewis's descendents, opening the grave is also an opportunity for closure.

    Mystery Still Surrounds Death of Explorer Meriwether Lewis

  • In Geneva Monday, European Union foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton condemned what she described as "grave human rights violations" by the Gadhafi government.

    France: Humanitarian Aid is Priority for Libya Crisis

  • The former director of governance at the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa questions why African leaders and the African Union have been “alarmingly silent” about the crisis in Libya following what he describes as the grave human rights abuses perpetrated by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi.

    Former U.N. Official Alarmed Over Africa’s Silence on Libya

  • Geither warned of what he called a "grave moment facing the nation" and said Congress has no choice but to act.

    Obama, Lawmakers Hold Sunday Talks on Deficit, Debt Deal

  • U.S.-based Human Rights Watch Thursday released a 47-page report, calling on Haiti to try Duvalier for what it calls grave violations of human rights.

    Human Rights Group Urges Haiti to Make History with 'Baby Doc' Trial

  • In another major development, Ahmed Gadhaf al-Dam, a Gadhafi cousin and one of his closest aides, announced that he has defected to Egypt to protest the bloody crackdown in what he called "grave violations to human rights and human and international laws," the AP reports.

    Gadhafi says he's only a 'symbolic leader,' blames unrest on al-Qaeda

Comments

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  • In Spanish, a word which is stressed on the penultimate syllable.

    October 25, 2007

  • Grave Accent: vis-à-vis

    December 19, 2006