Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To die.
  • noun The act of dying; death.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Departure from life; death.
  • noun Synonyms Death, Decease, Demise. Death is the common term for the ending of life. Decease is slightly euphemistic; it is less forcible and harsh than death. Demise applies primarily to a sovereign, who at death sends down or transmits his title, etc. (see quotation from Blackstone, under demise), and hence to others with reference to the transmission of their possessions. The use of demise for death apart from this idea is figurative, euphemistic, or stilted.
  • To depart from life; die.
  • Synonyms Expire, etc. See die.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun Departure, especially departure from this life; death.
  • intransitive verb To depart from this life; to die; to pass away.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun formal death
  • noun Departure, especially departure from this life
  • verb To die.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life
  • noun the event of dying or departure from life

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English decesen, from deces, death, from Old French, from Latin dēcessus, departure, death, from past participle of dēcēdere, to depart, die : dē-, de- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle French décès.

Examples

    Sorry, no example sentences found.

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