Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A pea.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A pea. See pea.
  • noun Peas collectively. For the distinction between peas and pease, see pea.
  • noun A small size of coal: same as pea-coal.
  • Same as peace.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete A pea.
  • noun A plural form of Pea. See the Note under Pea.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic form of pea, then later of peas
  • verb obsolete To make peace between (conflicting people, states etc.); to reconcile.
  • verb obsolete To bring (a war, conflict) to an end.
  • verb obsolete To placate, appease (someone).

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English; see pea.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English pise, from Late Latin pisa, variant of Latin pisum ("pea"), from Ancient Greek πίσον (pison), variant of πίσος (pisos).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Anglo-Norman paiser, pesser et al., Old French paisier, aphetic form of apaisier ("to appease"). Probably also partly from aphetic use of appease.

Examples

Comments

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  • Wordies, can we try to revive this elegant old spelling?

    June 21, 2008

  • Pretty pease?

    June 21, 2008

  • Why does it need reviving? Is it dying?

    June 21, 2008

  • It's a Christmasy way to ask politely.

    (No L.)

    June 21, 2008

  • I'd like to help the cause, bilby. Really I would. But I'm not sure how. Anyway, I have always liked peas, being a back-formation and all.

    June 21, 2008

  • I would just get a kick out of seeing the spelling pease in general use rather than peas.

    All I am saying is give pease a chance.

    June 21, 2008

  • Is whirled pease any different than whirled peas?

    (And of what is pea a back-formation?)

    June 21, 2008

  • There is a T-shirt with the same phrase somewhere in the web.

    June 21, 2008

  • Pease porridge hot,

    Pease porridge cold,

    Pease porridge in the pot

    Nine days old.

    Some like it hot,

    Some like it cold,

    Some like it in the pot

    Nine days old.

    June 21, 2008

  • Asat, pea is a back-formation of pease, which used to be standard name of the legume Pisum sativum (a relation of yours, perhaps?). The seeds of the pease were served as a dish (or a porridge, as dontcry reminds us), which was naturally called "pease", but then people started thinking, "Well, if these tasty green seeds are called 'pease', then one of these seeds must be a 'pea'!" Hence the modern word.

    June 22, 2008