jaime_d has looked up 300 words, created 5 lists, listed 418 words, written 291 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 1 word.

Comments by jaime_d

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution. Meaning: a lamp post on the street, used by Parisian mobs to string up the latest object of their fury.

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution
    the OED says that "melly" is an archaic word for "honey." However, in context, it looks like Carlyle meant melee. Very odd for him to spell it this way.

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution -- it's the name of a fashionable London social club of the time. "An Almack's Masquerade is not nothing; in more genial ages, your Christmas Guisings, Feasts of the Ass, Abbots of Unreason, were a considerable something: since sport they were; as Almacks may still be sincere wish for sport."

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • the great mystery of From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution: what does he mean by "tile-colored" (like "tile-colored beard"?)

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution "the Suburb" - meaning something like a place of inferior or debased habits of life.

    March 6, 2011

  • From Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution: "Astonished Europe rings with the mystery for ten months; sees only lie unfold itself from lie; corruption among the lofty and the low, gulosity, credulity, imbecility, strength nowhere but in the hunger. "

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • from Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution

    March 6, 2011

  • ". . .a ground plan of rococo inspiration: which is to say, portals with flying ramparts, mock-Tudor moldings, tympanums and astragals, plus (this was truly innovatory) a floridly imposing wing flanking it with its own gothic quad." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .a fairly lowly position but which had its own distinction, won by Hassan on account of his polymathic study of an almost unknown tumulus (and nobody who did know it could work out its import) from an oppidum civium romanorum which a scholar from Munich, a Judaist in flight from Austria's Anschluss, had found in diggings at Thugga (or, as it's nowadays known, Dougga)." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "Hassan Ibn Abbou's tomb is in a columbarium in Antony, a suburb of Paris. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .attacking that Bassalian titan, attacking it again and again, puncturing its invincibility, implanting in it, again and again, a harpoon as sharp as a bistoury. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .his sailors had torn off a giant rorqual's jaw. . " Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "You, Ishmail, phthisic pawn, glutton for musty old manuscripts, puny scribbling runt, martyr to a myriad of sulks, doldrums and mulligrubs, you who lit out, packing just a smock, four shirts and a cotton hanky in your bag. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "You, Ishmail, phthisic pawn, glutton for musty old manuscripts, puny scribbling runt, martyr to a myriad of sulks, doldrums and mulligrubs, you who lit out, packing just a smock, four shirts and a cotton hanky in your bag. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "Through this bar wafts a languorous aroma of amaryllis." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .Olga, a vision of Pariso-colonial chic in a viridian Arab tunic." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "Grooms, spivs and turf officials stroll to and fro; at a kiosk a young lad is shouting "Paris-Turf! Git your Paris-Turf!"; touts offload dubious tips and long columns start forming in front of casinos and gambling halls." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .finds him, a fat, slobbish layabout, rocking to and fro in a rococo rocking chair, lolling back on a cushion of soft kapok quilting. . " Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .a monkish cot to doss down on with torn pillows and a quilt fully of scummy stains. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .a bow window of milky-murky glass giving off a dark and turbid glow, a pallid photocopy of sunlight. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .and in Honolulu his fifth, Urbain, was a victim of hirudination, slain by a gigantic worm sucking his blood, totally draining him, so that as many as 20 transfusions would fail to bring him back." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • ". . .in Milan his fourth, Odilon, Luchino Visconti's right-hand man at La Scala, had a particularly bony portion of turbot catch in his throat. . " Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "a farrago without fustian" Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "a simoon in a long Finnish corridor. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "But a lancinating agony gnaws at my vitals." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "Mounting Sturmi, with its saffron housing and its caparison of indigo, and illustrious in his own gold strappings inlaid with opal. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "Sibylla, though, was so fond of Willigis, fond of him with a passion that sat oddly with kinship, that sororal adoration would gradually blossom into carnal lust. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "This incision in his olfactory tract producing a naso-dilation, Cochin profits from it by quickly scarifying Vowl's partition with a surgical pin, scraping it with a burin. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "or a giant grampus, baiting Jonah, trapping Cain, haunting Ahab; all avatars of that vital quiddity which no ocular straining will pull into focus. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • "Thus, on occasion, a sort of parabola, not fully confocal in form. . ." Gilbert Adair translation of Georges Perec's La Disparition

    August 11, 2010

  • meaning something like feudal tenants, it seems

    January 28, 2010

  • "The discobolus, she continued, who presently appeared on the anxious trot to ask the bloody impressionist and the screaming Madame Monet if they had seen his quoit was a bassetted and spatted Englishman whose carp's mouth and plaid knickerbockers sprang from the pages of Jerome K. Jerome."
    --Guy Davenport in "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg"

    January 19, 2010

  • Thanks for the tip, socjan, I will definitely check that out!

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport:
    "And on a fine English day in the high Victorian year 1868, the year of the first bicycle race and the Trades Union Congress at Manchester, of The Moonstone and The Ring and the Book and of the siege of Magdela, four men gathered at Ashley House in London, a house leafy with Virginia creeper, its interior harmoniously dark and bright, like an English forest, dark with corners and doors and halls, with mahogany and teak and drapes as red as cherries, bright with windows, Indian brass, and lamps like moons, Lord Lindsay pollskepped with the hatchels of a cassowary, Lord Adare whose face looked like a silver teapot, and the galliard Captain Wynne."

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport:
    "And on a fine English day in the high Victorian year 1868, the year of the first bicycle race and the Trades Union Congress at Manchester, of The Moonstone and The Ring and the Book and of the siege of Magdela, four men gathered at Ashley House in London, a house leafy with Virginia creeper, its interior harmoniously dark and bright, like an English forest, dark with corners and doors and halls, with mahogany and teak and drapes as red as cherries, bright with windows, Indian brass, and lamps like moons, Lord Lindsay pollskepped with the hatchels of a cassowary, Lord Adare whose face looked like a silver teapot, and the galliard Captain Wynne."

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport:
    "And on a fine English day in the high Victorian year 1868, the year of the first bicycle race and the Trades Union Congress at Manchester, of The Moonstone and The Ring and the Book and of the siege of Magdela, four men gathered at Ashley House in London, a house leafy with Virginia creeper, its interior harmoniously dark and bright, like an English forest, dark with corners and doors and halls, with mahogany and teak and drapes as red as cherries, bright with windows, Indian brass, and lamps like moons, Lord Lindsay pollskepped with the hatchels of a cassowary, Lord Adare whose face looked like a silver teapot, and the galliard Captain Wynne."

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport:
    "And on a fine English day in the high Victorian year 1868, the year of the first bicycle race and the Trades Union Congress at Manchester, of The Moonstone and The Ring and the Book and of the siege of Magdela, four men gathered at Ashley House in London, a house leafy with Virginia creeper, its interior harmoniously dark and bright, like an English forest, dark with corners and doors and halls, with mahogany and teak and drapes as red as cherries, bright with windows, Indian brass, and lamps like moons, Lord Lindsay pollskepped with the hatchels of a cassowary, Lord Adare whose face looked like a silver teapot, and the galliard Captain Wynne."

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • "The discobolus, she continued, who presently appeared on the anxious trot to ask the bloody impressionist and the screaming Madame Monet if they had seen his quoit was a bassetted and spatted Englishman whose carp's mouth and plaid knickerbockers sprang from the pages of Jerome K. Jerome."
    --Guy Davenport in "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg"

    January 19, 2010

  • "The discobolus, she continued, who presently appeared on the anxious trot to ask the bloody impressionist and the screaming Madame Monet if they had seen his quoit was a bassetted and spatted Englishman whose carp's mouth and plaid knickerbockers sprang from the pages of Jerome K. Jerome."
    --Guy Davenport in "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg"

    January 19, 2010

  • resin used for flavoring, used to be in medicine as an antispasmotic. From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • noun - wooden benches that can be used as chests. From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • jar or vase of classical antiquity with a large mouth to mix wine and water. From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • hat made of straw from an Italian wheat. From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • without friends or family. From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • Dutch version of a count. From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • fleeting, wayward, inconsistent. From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Haile Selassie Funeral Train" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010

  • Five things in the pattern you see on a dice's 5. From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • an unnamed thing. From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • inclined down from opposite directions. From "Au Tombeau de Charles Fourier" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • a sword. From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • a type of poetic meter or poem. From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • small couch or litter. From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • a robe of state. From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • adjective, meaning related to a funeral dinner. From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • A weasel. From "C. Musonius Rufus" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport. Means a small, stocky horse of central Asia Przewalski

    January 19, 2010

  • from "The Richard Nixon Freischutz Rag" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from "That Faire Field of Enna" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • Used as a verb in "That Faire Field of Enna" by Guy Davenport. Seems to be in the sense of being in heat (especially for foxes, hares)

    January 19, 2010

  • from "That Faire Field of Enna" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • being in the tradition of 12th century wandering students who read and capered for a living

    January 19, 2010

  • from essay "Jonathan Williams" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from essay "Jonathan Williams" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from essay "Jonathan Williams" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • from essay "Jonathan Williams" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • I never noticed this before. Wonderful list!

    January 19, 2010

  • "Rilkean angels, complex essences in a wind of light, fibrous with articulate memories, accidental events enriched into significance, a cherished smile, a long afternoon, a concupiscent dream, disappointments salvaged by courage, are the quiring that Fourier saw as a destiny of attractions." from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • "Rilkean angels, complex essences in a wind of light, fibrous with articulate memories, accidental events enriched into significance, a cherished smile, a long afternoon, a concupiscent dream, disappointments salvaged by courage, are the quiring that Fourier saw as a destiny of attractions." from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • "Torsos bare today, brown as gingerbread, innocent navels neatly punctuating suave mesial dents." from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • ". . .Catholicism cretinized French children (one knows what his hyperbole means, our fundamentalist doppers do the same), so it is now the young who cretinize themselves." from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • "Mouthbreathing German tourists with vacant eyes and macaque teeth clattering their goose gabble. . ." from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • a word poetically connected to tulips in "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • ". . .male orgasm after fugal intensity"
    from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

  • "Its plangencies cross philosophy at angles one might, with luck, trace." from "Apples and Pears" by Guy Davenport. Meant here, I think, similar to "reverberations"

    January 19, 2010

  • ". . .Heer rediscovers in this same Senonian bed the Eocene plant Sapotacites reticulatus, which he described in the Sachs-Thuringen lignite beds." "Fifty-seven Views of Fujiyama" by Guy Davenport

    January 19, 2010

Comments for jaime_d

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  • Well, there's a good idea. :-)

    July 19, 2009

  • But why not put in some citations so we can see how the words are being used? Can't have enough Thoreau on Wordie :-)

    July 19, 2009

  • Yeah, I know you're right. I hope you didn't take offence though jaime, because I didn't mean anything bad by it.

    July 19, 2009

  • Possible, many people use Wordie to list words or phrases they come across in reading. No big deal.

    July 19, 2009

  • What on Earth is with you and Thoreau's A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers????

    July 19, 2009