Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Shaped like a biconvex lens.
  • adjective Of or relating to a lens.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Of or pertaining to lenses generally.
  • Resembling a lentil in size or form.
  • Having the form of a double-convex lens, as some sends.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective Resembling a lentil in size or form; having the form of a double-convex lens.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Of or pertaining to a lens.
  • adjective Shaped like a biconvex lens.
  • adjective Relating to a lenticular image.
  • noun A lenticular image.
  • noun A lenticular galaxy.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective convex on both sides; shaped like a lentil

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin lenticulāris, lentil-shaped, from lenticula, lentil; see lentil.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin lenticulāris ("lentil-shaped"), from lēns ("a lentil").

Examples

  • These so-called lenticular screens are easy to produce, and have even shown up on Sharp laptop PCs and cell phones sold in Japan.

    It Doesn't Just Look Real--It Is Real

  • And, in this particular case, we were caught in what's called a lenticular cloud, which may have been what Quinn was in as well.

    CNN Transcript Dec 18, 2006

  • In places, this later tissue, especially in early life, is collected into little masses, which to a certain extent resemble the solitary nodules of the intestine, and are termed the lenticular glands of the stomach.

    XI. Splanchnology. 1F. The Stomach

  • The portion of the males found engaged in the body of our queens, hitherto called the lenticular substance, may be denominated a penis both from its position and use.

    New observations on the natural history of bees

  • In an adjacent exhibition room, a row of 65-inch flat screens runs 3D animated films of flowers and plants that visitors can view without special glasses because the screens have been engineered to display something known as lenticular imaging.

    Breaking News: CBS News

  • Similarly, the shape of the putamen and globus pallidus resembles a lens, and they are collectively called the lenticular nucleus.

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • Another name of this technology is called lenticular lenses tech.

    X-bit labs

  • In an adjacent exhibition room, a row of 65-inch flat screens runs 3D animated films of flowers and plants that visitors can view without special glasses because the screens have been engineered to display something known as lenticular imaging.

    The Seattle Times

  • In an adjacent exhibition room, a row of 65-inch flat screens runs 3D animated films of flowers and plants that visitors can view without special glasses because the screens have been engineered to display something known as lenticular imaging.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • Using "lenticular" technology, the separate left and right eye images are interlaced on a furrowed surface to create the stereoscopic illusion.

    HomePage - The Sun

Comments

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  • A printing technology that uses a lenticular lens to create an illusion of depth or animation when the image is viewed at different angles.

    Wikipedia:

    Each image is sliced into strips, which are then interlaced with one or more other images. These are printed on the back of a piece of plastic, with a series of long, thin lenses molded into the other side. The lenses are lined up with each image interlace, so that light reflected off each strip is refracted in a slightly different direction, but the light from all strips of a given image are sent in the same direction (parallel).

    The end result is that a single eye or camera looking at the print sees a single whole image, but an eye or camera with a different angle of view will see a different image.

    September 5, 2008

  • From "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg" by Guy Davenport.

    January 19, 2010