Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. a discus thrower
  • n. a statue of a discus thrower

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A thrower of the discus.
  • n. A statue of an athlete holding the discus, or about to throw it.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In classical antiquity, a thrower of the discus; one engaged in the exercise of throwing the discus; specifically [capitalized], a famous ancient statue by Myron (fifth century B.C.), representing a man in the act of throwing a discus.

Etymologies

Ancient Greek δισκοβόλος ("discus thrower"), from δίσκος ("discus") + βάλλω ("throw") (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • If we may trust the old marbles, -- my friend with his arm stretched over my head, above there, (in plaster of Paris,) or the discobolus, whom one may see at the principal sculpture gallery of this metropolis, -- those Greek young men were of supreme beauty.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 04, No. 26, December, 1859

  • No statue of a warrior was sculptured in the varied attitudes of attack and defence; no wrestler, no _discobolus_, no pugilist exhibited the grace, the vigor, or the muscular action of a man; nor were the beauties, the feeling, and the elegance of female forms displayed in stone: all was made to conform to the same invariable model, which confined the human figure to a few conventional postures.

    Museum of Antiquity A Description of Ancient Life

  • You are strong enough, certainly, but the art of the discobolus must be learned like any other.

    Homo Sum — Volume 01

  • The eyes, the facial lines which they gather into one, seem ready to follow the coming motion of the discus as those of an onlooker might be; [289] but that head does not really belong to the discobolus.

    Greek Studies: a Series of Essays

  • In any passable representation of the Greek discobolus, as in any passable representation of an English cricketer, there can be no successful evasion of the natural difficulties of the thing to be done -- the difficulties of competing with nature itself, or its maker, in that marvellous combination of motion and rest, of inward mechanism with the so smoothly finished surface and outline -- finished ad unguem -- which enfold it.

    Greek Studies: a Series of Essays

  • If we may trust the old marbles, my friend with his arm stretched over my head, above there, (in plaster of Paris,) or the discobolus, whom one may see at the principal sculpture gallery of this metropolis, -- those Greek young men were of supreme beauty.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Works

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Comments

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  • "The discobolus, she continued, who presently appeared on the anxious trot to ask the bloody impressionist and the screaming Madame Monet if they had seen his quoit was a bassetted and spatted Englishman whose carp's mouth and plaid knickerbockers sprang from the pages of Jerome K. Jerome."
    --Guy Davenport in "A Field of Snow on a Slope of the Rosenberg"

    January 19, 2010

  • (n): 1. in ancient Greece or Rome, the thrower of the discus, or quoit.
    2. The statue of a discus thrower attributed to Myron, 5th Century b.c.
    Also discobolus

    January 6, 2009