Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A short horizontal bar suspended from two parallel ropes, used for gymnastic exercises or for acrobatic stunts.
  • n. An article of women's clothing, such as a jacket, dress, or coat, that is cut so as to hang down from the shoulders and swing out and away around the hips and legs.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A trapezium.
  • n. A swinging horizontal bar, suspended at each end by a rope; — used by gymnasts.
  • v. To swing on a trapeze

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A trapezium. See trapezium, 1.
  • n. A swinging horizontal bar, suspended at each end by a rope; -- used by gymnasts.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A trapezium.
  • n. In gymnastics, a swing consisting of one or more cross-bars, each suspended by two cords at some distance from the ground, on which various exercises or feats of strength and agility are performed.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a swing used by circus acrobats

Etymologies

French trapèze, from Late Latin trapezium, trapezoid; see trapezium.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French trapèze, from Latin trapezium. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • There also is "what we call a trapeze jump" on one of the eastern towers, Hale said - a trapeze bar suspended about 7 feet from the tower, about chest high.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • There also is "what we call a trapeze jump" on one of the eastern towers, Hale said - a trapeze bar suspended about seven feet from the tower, about chest high.

    Glenwood Springs Post Independent - Top Stories

  • Joe started for the animal tent, and then remembered that he needed in his act that day a certain short trapeze, the ends of the ropes being provided with hooks that caught over the bar of another trapeze.

    Joe Strong on the Trapeze or The Daring Feats of a Young Circus Performer

  • In another, two dancers do a slow trapeze, which is harder—think about it—than a fast one, and sing a version of Rowland Salley's "Killing the Blues."

    Brooklyn Crew Hangs in There

  • Another humorist, one accustomed to view the world from heights known as trapeze elevations, we met a little later on our way out of the narrow upper streets; he was also looking down over Trouville.

    In and out of Three Normady Inns

  • You can also call the trapeze center to verify the balance under my name.

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  • Poses that I accomplished on the trapeze were the mermaid - which requires you roll on the trapeze bar and stretch into a mermaid pose - and the standing star - a move that dares you to stand on the ropes and extend your body in the form of a shining star.

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  • Associated Press Yves Saint Laurent The "trapeze" look, which took its name from the French word for trapezoid, was a runway hit that changed the shape of women's fashions for years to come.

    Yves Saint Laurent's Confidence

  • I'm loving the trapeze silhouette lately "trapeze" sounds so much better than "tent", doesn't it?

    The Girl in the Gray Flannel Dress - A Dress A Day

  • From where we stood subterranean passages led to the advanced trenches down there, and to a famous "trapeze" on the right of the German position, forming an angle behind the enemy's lines, so that now and again their soldiers might be seen.

    The Soul of the War

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