Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To move back and forth suspended or as if suspended from above.
  • intransitive v. To hit at something with a sweeping motion of the arm: swung at the ball.
  • intransitive v. To move laterally or in a curve: The car swung over to the curb.
  • intransitive v. To turn in place on or as if on a hinge or pivot.
  • intransitive v. To move along with an easy, swaying gait: swinging down the road.
  • intransitive v. To propel oneself from one place or position to another by grasping a fixed support: swinging through the trees.
  • intransitive v. To ride on a swing.
  • intransitive v. To shift from one attitude, interest, condition, or emotion to another; vacillate.
  • intransitive v. Slang To be put to death by hanging.
  • intransitive v. Music To have a subtle, intuitively felt rhythm or sense of rhythm.
  • intransitive v. Music To play with a subtle, intuitively felt sense of rhythm.
  • intransitive v. Slang To be lively, trendy, and exciting.
  • intransitive v. Slang To engage freely in promiscuous sex.
  • intransitive v. Slang To exchange sex partners. Used especially of married couples.
  • intransitive v. Slang To have a sexual orientation toward one or both sexes.
  • transitive v. To cause to move back and forth, as on a swing.
  • transitive v. To cause to move in a broad arc or curve: swing a bat; swung the car over.
  • transitive v. To cause to move with a sweeping motion: swinging his arms.
  • transitive v. To lift and convey with a sweeping motion: swung the cargo onto the deck.
  • transitive v. To suspend so as to sway or turn freely: swung a hammock between two trees.
  • transitive v. To suspend on hinges: swing a shutter.
  • transitive v. To cause to turn on hinges: swung the door shut.
  • transitive v. To cause to shift from one attitude, position, opinion, or condition to another.
  • transitive v. Informal To manage or arrange successfully: swing a deal.
  • transitive v. Informal To bring around to the desired result: swing an election.
  • transitive v. Music To play (music) with a subtle, intuitively felt sense of rhythm.
  • n. The act or an instance of swinging; movement back and forth or in one particular direction.
  • n. The sweep or scope of something that swings: The pendulum's swing is 12 inches.
  • n. A blow or stroke executed with a sweeping motion of the arm.
  • n. The manner in which one swings something, such as a bat or golf club.
  • n. A shift from one attitude, position, or condition to another: a swing to conservatism.
  • n. Freedom of action: The children have free swing in deciding what color to paint their room.
  • n. A swaying, graceful motion: has a swing to her walk.
  • n. A sweep back and forth: the swing of a bird across the sky.
  • n. A course or tour that returns to the starting point: a swing across the state while campaigning.
  • n. A seat suspended from above, as by ropes, on which one can ride back and forth for recreation.
  • n. The normal rhythm of life or pace of activities: back in the swing.
  • n. A steady, vigorous rhythm or movement, as in verse.
  • n. A regular movement up or down, as in stock prices.
  • n. Music A type of popular dance music developed about 1935 and based on jazz but employing a larger band, less improvisation, and simpler harmonic and rhythmic patterns.
  • n. Music A ballroom dance performed to this music.
  • n. Music A subtle, intuitively felt rhythmic quality or sense of rhythm.
  • adj. Music Relating to or performing swing: a swing band.
  • adj. Determining an outcome; decisive: the swing vote.
  • idiom in full swing At the highest level of activity or operation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The manner in which something is swung.
  • n. A hanging seat in a children's playground, for acrobats in a circus, or on a porch for relaxing.
  • n. A dance style.
  • n. The genre of music associated with this dance style.
  • n. The amount of change towards or away from something.
  • n. Sideways movement of the ball as it flies through the air.
  • n. The diameter that a lathe can cut.
  • n. In a musical theater production, a performer who understudies several roles.
  • n. A basic dance step in which a pair link hands and turn round together in a circle.
  • v. To move backward and forward, especially rotating about or hanging from a fixed point.
  • v. To dance.
  • v. To ride on a swing.
  • v. To participate in the swinging lifestyle; to participate in wife-swapping.
  • v. To hang from the gallows.
  • v. to move sideways in its trajectory.
  • v. To fluctuate or change.
  • v. To move (an object) backward and forward; to wave.
  • v. To change (a numerical result); especially to change the outcome of an election.
  • v. To make (something) work; especially to afford (something) financially.
  • v. To play notes that are in pairs by making the first of the pair slightly longer than written (augmentation) and the second, resulting in a bouncy, uneven rhythm.
  • v. (of a bowler) to make the ball move sideways in its trajectory.
  • v. To move one's arm in a punching motion.
  • v. In dancing, when you turn around in a small circle with your partner, holding hands or arms. You can say "swing your partner", or just "swing".

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To move to and fro, as a body suspended in the air; to wave; to vibrate; to oscillate.
  • intransitive v. To sway or move from one side or direction to another.
  • intransitive v. To use a swing. See Swing, n., 3.
  • intransitive v. To turn round by action of wind or tide when at anchor.
  • intransitive v. To be hanged.
  • transitive v. To cause to swing or vibrate; to cause to move backward and forward, or from one side to the other.
  • transitive v. To give a circular movement to; to whirl; to brandish; ; hence, colloquially, to manage.
  • transitive v. To admit or turn (anything) for the purpose of shaping it; -- said of a lathe.
  • n. The act of swinging; a waving, oscillating, or vibratory motion of a hanging or pivoted object; oscillation.
  • n. Swaying motion from one side or direction to the other.
  • n. A line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which anything may swing; especially, an apparatus for recreation by swinging, commonly consisting of a rope, the two ends of which are attached overhead, as to the bough of a tree, a seat being placed in the loop at the bottom; also, any contrivance by which a similar motion is produced for amusement or exercise.
  • n. Influence of power of a body put in swaying motion.
  • n. Capacity of a turning lathe, as determined by the diameter of the largest object that can be turned in it.
  • n. Free course; unrestrained liberty or license; tendency.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To move to and fro, as a body suspended from a fixed point or line of support; vibrate; oscillate.
  • To move or oscillate in any plane about a fixed point or line of support: often with round: as, a gate swings on its hinges; the boom of a vessel swings round.
  • To move with a free swaying motion, as soldiers on the march; sometimes, to move with a bouncing motion. See swinging, participial adjective
  • To move backward and forward on a suspended rope or on a seat suspended by ropes; ride in a swing.
  • Nautical, to move or float round with the wind or tide, as a ship riding at a single anchor.
  • To be hanged; be suspended by the neck till dead.
  • To cause to sway or oscillate; cause to vibrate, as a body suspended in the air; cause to move backward and forward below or about a fixed point or line of support.
  • To support and move in some way resembling or suggesting the movement of a suspended body, as a pendulum; move freely through the air: used of a great variety of acts: as, to swing one's arms in walking; to swing a club about one's head; to swing a stone with a crane.
  • Hence, to manage; control: as, to swing a large business.
  • To move as if by swinging about an axis or fixed point; cause to move in a way resembling in some degree the motion of a spoke of a wheel.
  • To suspend so as to hang freely between points of support; suspend freely.
  • To pack, as herrings, in casks or barrels.
  • n. The act of swinging; an oscillation or vibration; the sweep of a body moving in suspension from or about a fixed support: used with much latitude and often figuratively.
  • n. A free or swinging movement or gait: often used figuratively.
  • n. A line or cord, suspended and hanging loose, on which something may swing or oscillate; especially, a seat slung by a rope or ropes, the ends of which are fastened to points of support at the same distance above the ground, between which the seat hangs freely, used in the sport of swinging backward and forward. Swings are also made in which strips of wood take the place of the rope.
  • n. Free course; abandonment to any motive; one's own way; unrestrained liberty or license.
  • n. Unrestrained tendency; natural bent: as, the swing of propensities.
  • n. In a lathe, the distance between the head-center and the bed or ways of the machine, this distance limiting the diameter of the work placed in the lathe: hence a lathe may be described as having a 6-inch swing, an 18-inch swing, etc.
  • n. In a carriage-wheel, the apparent cant or leaning outward of the upper half of the wheel; the dish or dishing of the wheel. See dish, v. t., 2.
  • n. The rope or chain reaching forward from the end of the tongue of a wagon along which a team in front of the wheelers is hitched by a swingletree. This team is said to be in the swing.
  • n. The team so harnessed; in a six-horse or six-mule team, the pair of animals between the wheelers and the leaders; also, the position of this pair of animals, or their relation to the rest of the team.
  • n. In photography: A swing-back.
  • n. The motion or function of a swing-back, including the single swing and the double swing.
  • n. With eager haste; with violence and impetuosity: an elliptical quasi-adverbial use.
  • In cricket, to curve in the air: said of a ball.
  • To be able to receive and operate upon, as a lathe or other tool in which the work must revolve without striking any part of the frame.
  • To be able to lift and transport, as a crane.
  • To cause (a bowled ball) to curve in the air.
  • n. In golf, the manner in which the club is swung in the act of striking the ball.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. move in a curve or arc, usually with the intent of hitting
  • v. play with a subtle and intuitively felt sense of rhythm
  • v. be a social swinger; socialize a lot
  • v. engage freely in promiscuous sex, often with the husband or wife of one's friends
  • n. a jaunty rhythm in music
  • v. change direction with a swinging motion; turn
  • v. move or walk in a swinging or swaying manner
  • v. make a big sweeping gesture or movement
  • n. changing location by moving back and forth
  • v. alternate dramatically between high and low values
  • n. a sweeping blow or stroke
  • n. mechanical device used as a plaything to support someone swinging back and forth
  • n. a state of steady vigorous action that is characteristic of an activity
  • n. a square dance figure; a pair of dancers join hands and dance around a point between them
  • n. in baseball; a batter's attempt to hit a pitched ball
  • v. hit or aim at with a sweeping arm movement
  • v. influence decisively
  • v. hang freely
  • n. the act of swinging a golf club at a golf ball and (usually) hitting it
  • n. a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930s; flowing rhythms but less complex than later styles of jazz
  • v. have a certain musical rhythm
  • v. live in a lively, modern, and relaxed style

Etymologies

Middle English swingen, to beat, brandish, from Old English swingan, to flog, strike, swing.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English swingen, from Old English swingan, from Proto-Germanic *swinganan (cf. German schwingen 'to brandish', Swedish svinga), from Proto-Indo-European *su̯eng (cf. Scottish Gaelic seang 'thin'). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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