Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To change in position from one point to another: moved away from the window.
  • intransitive v. To progress in sequence; go forward: a novel that moves slowly.
  • intransitive v. To follow a specified course: Earth moves around the sun.
  • intransitive v. To progress toward a particular state or condition: moving up in the company; moved into the lead.
  • intransitive v. To go from one residence or location to another; relocate.
  • intransitive v. To start off; depart.
  • intransitive v. To be disposed of by sale: Woolens move slowly in the summer.
  • intransitive v. To change posture or position; stir: was afraid to move.
  • intransitive v. Games To change the position of a piece in a board game.
  • intransitive v. To be put in motion or to turn according to a prescribed motion. Used of machinery.
  • intransitive v. To exhibit great activity or energy.
  • intransitive v. To initiate an action; act.
  • intransitive v. To be active in a particular environment: moves in diplomatic circles.
  • intransitive v. To stir the emotions: words that have the power to move.
  • intransitive v. To make a formal motion in parliamentary procedure: move for an adjournment.
  • intransitive v. To evacuate. Used of the bowels.
  • transitive v. To change the place or position of: moved her office; could not move his arm.
  • transitive v. To cause to go from one place to another: moved the crowd away.
  • transitive v. Games To change (a piece) from one position to another in a board game: moved a pawn.
  • transitive v. To change the course of: moved the discussion to other matters.
  • transitive v. To dislodge from a fixed point of view, as by persuasion: "Speak to him, ladies, see if you can move him” ( Shakespeare).
  • transitive v. To prompt to an action; rouse: Anger moved her to speak out.
  • transitive v. To set or keep in motion.
  • transitive v. To cause to function.
  • transitive v. To cause to progress or advance.
  • transitive v. To arouse the emotions of; affect.
  • transitive v. To excite or provoke to the expression of an emotion: The film moved me to tears. See Synonyms at affect1.
  • transitive v. To propose or request in formal parliamentary procedure: moved that a vote be taken.
  • transitive v. To make formal application to (a court, for example).
  • transitive v. To dispose of by sale: moved the new merchandise quickly.
  • transitive v. To cause (the bowels) to evacuate.
  • n. The act or an instance of moving.
  • n. A particular manner of moving: made some intricate moves on the dance floor.
  • n. A change of residence or location.
  • n. Games An act of transferring a piece from one position to another in board games.
  • n. Games The prescribed manner in which a piece may be played.
  • n. Games A participant's turn to make a play.
  • n. An action taken to achieve an objective; a maneuver: a move to halt the arms race.
  • move in To begin to occupy a residence or place of business.
  • idiom get a move on Informal To get started; get going.
  • idiom move in on To make intrusive advances toward; intrude on.
  • idiom move in on To attempt to seize control of: moving in on their territory.
  • idiom on the move Busily moving about; active: A nurse is on the move all day.
  • idiom on the move Going from one place to another: troops on the move.
  • idiom on the move Making progress; advancing: a technology that is clearly on the move.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another.
  • v. To act; to take action; to stir; to begin to act; as, to move in a matter.
  • v. To change residence; to remove, as from one house, town, or state, to another; to go and live at another place. See also move out and move in.
  • v. To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.
  • v. To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir.
  • v. To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another, according to the rules of the game; as, to move a king.
  • v. To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.
  • v. To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion, to excite, as an emotion.
  • v. To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit, as a resolution to be adopted; as, to move to adjourn.
  • v. To mention; to raise (a question); to suggest (a course of action); to lodge (a complaint).
  • v. To incite, urge (someone to do something); to solicit (someone for or of an issue); to make a proposal to.
  • v. To apply to, as for aid.
  • n. The act of moving; a movement.
  • n. An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.
  • n. A formalized or practiced action used in athletics, dance, physical exercise, self-defense, hand-to-hand combat, etc.
  • n. The event of changing one's residence.
  • n. A change in strategy.
  • n. The act of moving a token on a gameboard from one position to another according to the rules of the game.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir
  • transitive v. To transfer (a piece or man) from one space or position to another on a playing board, according to the rules of the game.
  • transitive v. To excite to action by the presentation of motives; to rouse by representation, persuasion, or appeal; to influence.
  • transitive v. To arouse the feelings or passions of; especially, to excite to tenderness or compassion; to touch pathetically; to excite, as an emotion.
  • transitive v. To propose; to recommend; specifically, to propose formally for consideration and determination, in a deliberative assembly; to submit, as a resolution to be adopted.
  • transitive v. To apply to, as for aid.
  • intransitive v. To change place or posture; to stir; to go, in any manner, from one place or position to another.
  • intransitive v. To act; to take action; to stir; to begin to act.
  • intransitive v. To change residence; to remove, as from one house, town, or state, to another.
  • intransitive v. To change the place of a piece in accordance with the rules of the game.
  • n. The act of moving; a movement.
  • n. The act of moving one of the pieces, from one position to another, in the progress of the game; also, the opportunity or obligation to so move a piece; one's turn.
  • n. An act for the attainment of an object; a step in the execution of a plan or purpose.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To cause to change place or posture in any manner or by any means; carry, convey, or draw from one place to another; set in motion; stir; impel: as, the wind moves a ship; the servant moved the furniture.
  • To excite to action; influence; induce; incite; arouse; awaken, as the senses or the mental faculties or emotions.
  • To rouse or excite the feelings of; provoke; stir up: used either absolutely or with a phrase or preposition to indicate the nature of the feelings roused: as, he was moved with or to anger or compassion. Used absolutely:
  • To affect with tender feelings; touch.
  • To agitate or influence by persuasion or rhetorical art.
  • To propose; bring forward; offer formally; submit, as a motion for consideration by a deliberative assembly: now used only in such phrases as to move a resolution, or to move that a proposal be agreed to.
  • To submit a question, motion, or formal proposal to.
  • To address one's self to; call upon; apply to; speak to about an affair.
  • To complete the course of.
  • To cause to act or operate: as, to move the bowels.
  • To pass from place to place; change position, continuously or occasionally: as, the earth moves round the sun.
  • To advance as in a course of development or progress.
  • To change one's place or posture consciously, or by direct personal effort: often in a specified direction from or to an indicated place.
  • To walk; proceed; march.
  • To carry one's self, with reference to demeanor, port, or gait: as, to move with dignity and grace.
  • To change residence: as, we move next week.
  • To take action; begin to act; act.
  • In chess, draughts, and some similar games, to change the position of a piece in the course of play: as, whose turn is it to move?
  • To bow or lift the hat; salute.
  • In music, of a voice or voice-part, to progress from one pitch to another; pass from tone to tone.
  • n. A change of position or relation.
  • n. The right or turn to move a piece: as, it is my move now.
  • n. A proceeding; a course of action: as, he hoped by that move to disconcert, his opponents.
  • n. Synonyms Movement, etc. See motion.
  • n. To move a piece in a game, as in checkers, chess, etc.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the act of changing your residence or place of business
  • v. progress by being changed
  • v. change residence, affiliation, or place of employment
  • v. arouse sympathy or compassion in
  • v. have a turn; make one's move in a game
  • v. move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion
  • v. have an emotional or cognitive impact upon
  • n. (game) a player's turn to take some action permitted by the rules of the game
  • v. go or proceed from one point to another
  • v. follow a procedure or take a course
  • n. a change of position that does not entail a change of location
  • v. be in a state of action
  • n. the act of deciding to do something
  • n. the act of changing location from one place to another
  • v. perform an action, or work out or perform (an action)
  • v. propose formally; in a debate or parliamentary meeting
  • v. change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically
  • v. dispose of by selling
  • v. give an incentive for action
  • v. live one's life in a specified environment
  • v. cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense

Etymologies

Middle English moven, from Old French movoir, from Latin movēre; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English moven, moeven, meven, from Anglo-Norman mover, moveir and Old French mouver, moveir ("to move") (compare modern French mouvoir from Old French movoir), from Latin movēre, present active infinitive of moveō ("move; change, exchange, go in or out, quit"), from Proto-Indo-European *meue-, *(a)mewǝ-, *mwō- (“to move, drive”). Cognate with Lithuanian mauti ("to push on, rush"), Sanskrit  (mīvati, "pushes, presses, moves"), Middle Dutch mouwe ("sleeve"). More at muff. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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