Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To lower and raise the head quickly, as in agreement or acknowledgment.
  • intransitive v. To let the head fall forward when sleepy.
  • intransitive v. To be careless or momentarily inattentive as if sleepy; lapse: Even Homer nods.
  • intransitive v. To sway, move up and down, or droop, as flowers in the wind.
  • transitive v. To lower and raise (the head) quickly in agreement or acknowledgment.
  • transitive v. To express by lowering and raising the head: nod one's agreement.
  • transitive v. To summon, guide, or send by nodding the head: She nodded us into the room.
  • n. A forward or up-and-down movement of the head, usually expressive of drowsiness or agreement: a nod of affirmation.
  • n. An indication of approval or assent: The contestant got the nod from the judges.
  • nod off To doze momentarily: nodded off during the lecture.
  • nod out Slang To fall asleep, especially as a result of taking a drug.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To incline the head up and down, as to indicate agreement.
  • v. to sway, move up and down
  • v. To gradually fall asleep.
  • v. To make a mistake by being temporarily inattentive or tired
  • v. To head; to strike the ball with one's head.
  • v. To allude to something.
  • v. To fall asleep while under the influence of opiates.
  • n. An instance of moving one's head as described above.
  • n. A reference or allusion to something.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To bend or incline the upper part, with a quick motion.
  • intransitive v. To incline the head with a quick motion; to make a slight bow; to make a motion of assent, of salutation, or of drowsiness, with the head.
  • intransitive v. To be careless or inattentive; to make a mistake from lack of attention.
  • intransitive v. To be drowsy or dull; to doze off, especially while in a sitting position.
  • transitive v. To incline or bend, as the head or top; to make a motion of assent, of salutation, or of drowsiness with.
  • transitive v. To signify by a nod.
  • transitive v. To cause to bend.
  • n. A dropping or bending forward of the upper part or top of anything.
  • n. A quick or slight downward or forward motion of the head, in assent, in familiar salutation, in drowsiness, or in giving a signal, or a command.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To incline or droop the head forward with a short, quick, involuntary motion, as when drowsy or sleepy; specifically, in botany, to droop or curve downward by a short bend in the peduncle: said of flowers. See nodding, p. a.
  • Figuratively, to be guilty of a lapse or inadvertence, as when nodding with drowsiness.
  • To salute, beckon, or express assent by a slight, quick inclination of the head.
  • To bend or incline the top or part corresponding to the head with a quick jerky motion, simulating the nodding of a drowsy person.
  • To incline or bend, as the head or top.
  • To signify by a nod: as, to nod assent.
  • To affect by a nod or nods in a manner expressed by a word or words connected: as, to nod one out of the room; to nod one's head off.
  • n. A short, quick, forward and downward motion of the head, either voluntary, as when used as a familiar salutation, a sign of assent or approbation, or given as a signal, command, etc., or involuntary, as when one is drowsy or sleepy.
  • n. A quick forward or downward inclination of the upper part or top of anything.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. let the head fall forward through drowsiness
  • v. express or signify by nodding
  • v. lower and raise the head, as to indicate assent or agreement or confirmation
  • n. a sign of assent or salutation or command
  • v. sway gently back and forth, as in a nodding motion
  • v. be almost asleep
  • n. the act of nodding the head

Etymologies

Middle English nodden; perhaps akin to Middle High German notten.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Unknown. Dates to late 14th century, probably comes from Old English; may be related to Old High German hnoton ("to shake"), from Proto-Germanic *hnudōnan. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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