Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To bend forward and down from the waist or the middle of the back: had to stoop in order to fit into the cave.
  • intransitive v. To walk or stand, especially habitually, with the head and upper back bent forward.
  • intransitive v. To bend or sag downward.
  • intransitive v. To lower or debase oneself.
  • intransitive v. To descend from a superior position; condescend.
  • intransitive v. To yield; submit.
  • intransitive v. To swoop down, as a bird in pursuing its prey.
  • transitive v. To bend (the head or body) forward and down.
  • transitive v. To debase; humble.
  • n. The act of stooping.
  • n. A forward bending of the head and upper back, especially when habitual.
  • n. An act of self-abasement or condescension.
  • n. A descent, as of a bird of prey.
  • n. Chiefly Northeastern U.S. A small porch, platform, or staircase leading to the entrance of a house or building.
  • n. Variant of stoup.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The staircase and landing or porch leading to the entrance of a residence.
  • n. The threshold of a doorway, a doorstep.
  • v. To bend oneself, or one's head, forward and downward.
  • v. To lower oneself; to demean or do something below one's status, standards, or morals.
  • v. Of a bird of prey: to swoop down on its prey.
  • n. A stooping (ie. bent, see the "Verb" section above) position of the body
  • n. An accelerated descent in flight, as that for an attack.
  • n. A post or pillar, especially a gatepost or a support in a mine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Originally, a covered porch with seats, at a house door; the Dutch stoep as introduced by the Dutch into New York. Afterward, an out-of-door flight of stairs of from seven to fourteen steps, with platform and parapets, leading to an entrance door some distance above the street; the French perron. Hence, any porch, platform, entrance stairway, or small veranda, at a house door.
  • n. A vessel of liquor; a flagon.
  • n. A post fixed in the earth.
  • n. The act of stooping, or bending the body forward; inclination forward; also, an habitual bend of the back and shoulders.
  • n. Descent, as from dignity or superiority; condescension; an act or position of humiliation.
  • n. The fall of a bird on its prey; a swoop.
  • intransitive v. To bend the upper part of the body downward and forward; to bend or lean forward; to incline forward in standing or walking; to assume habitually a bent position.
  • intransitive v. To yield; to submit; to bend, as by compulsion; to assume a position of humility or subjection.
  • intransitive v. To descend from rank or dignity; to condescend.
  • intransitive v. To come down as a hawk does on its prey; to pounce; to souse; to swoop.
  • intransitive v. To sink when on the wing; to alight.
  • transitive v. To bend forward and downward; to bow down.
  • transitive v. To cause to incline downward; to slant.
  • transitive v. To cause to submit; to prostrate.
  • transitive v. To degrade.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bend; bow; incline; especially, of persons, to lower the body by bending forward and downward.
  • To be bent or inclined from the perpendicular; specifically, to carry the head and shoulders habitually bowed forward from the upright line of the rest of the body.
  • To come down; descend.
  • Specifically, to swoop upon prey or quarry, as a hawk; pounce.
  • To condescend; deign: especially expressing a lowering of the moral self, and generally followed by an infinitive or the proposition to.
  • To yield; submit; succumb.
  • To bend downward; bow.
  • To incline; tilt: as, to stoop a cask.
  • To bring or take down; lower, as a flag or a sail.
  • To put down; abase; submit; subject.
  • To cast down; prostrate; overthrow; overcome.
  • To swoop or pounce down upon.
  • To steep; macerate.
  • n. The act of stooping or bending down; hence, a habitual bend of the back or shoulders: as, to walk with a stoop.
  • n. The darting down of a bird on its prey; a swoop; a pounce.
  • n. Hence That which stoops or swoops; a hawk.
  • n. A descent from superiority, dignity, or power; a condescension, concession, or submission: as, a politic stoop.
  • n. A drinking-vessel; a beaker; a flagon; a tankard; a pitcher.
  • n. Hence Liquor for drinking, especially wine, considered as the contents of a stoop: as, he tossed off his stoop.
  • n. A basin for holy water, usuallyplaced in a niche or against the wall or a pillar at the entrance of Roman Catholic churches: also used in private houses.
  • n. An uncovered platform before the entrance of a house, raised, and approached by means of steps. Sometimes incorrectly used for porch or veranda.
  • n. The stock or stem, as of a tree; the stump.
  • n. A post or pillar; specifically, an upright post used to mark distance, etc., on a racecourse.
  • n. An upright support; a prop or column; specifically, in coal-mining, a pillar of coal left to support the roof.
  • n. Figuratively, a sustainer; a patron.
  • n.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. debase oneself morally, act in an undignified, unworthy, or dishonorable way
  • n. an inclination of the top half of the body forward and downward
  • v. sag, bend, bend over or down
  • v. carry oneself, often habitually, with head, shoulders, and upper back bent forward
  • v. descend swiftly, as if on prey
  • n. basin for holy water
  • v. bend one's back forward from the waist on down
  • n. small porch or set of steps at the front entrance of a house

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English stoupen, from Old English stūpian.
Dutch stoep, front verandah, from Middle Dutch.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Dutch stoep ("platform", "pavement"). Cognate with English "step".

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English stūpian ("to bow, to bend"). Compare steep.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old Norse stolpe

Examples

Comments

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  • Against this wall, there was a trellis of moonflowers, which popped open like small white parachutes at twilight in the summertime, and between the trellis and the stoop you could pull up water from a cistern in the veritable oaken bucket of the song.

    —James Thurber, 1952, 'Daguerreotype of a Lady', in The Thurber Album

    In this sense (‘An uncovered platform before the entrance of a house, raised, and approached by means of steps. Sometimes incorrectly used for porch or veranda.’) a N.Am. word, first recorded 1789, from Dutch 'stoep', of similar meaning in relation to Dutch domestic architecture and also used in English under that spelling.

    July 10, 2008