Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A fleshy fruit, such as a peach, plum, or cherry, usually having a single hard stone that encloses a seed.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In botany, a stone-fruit; a fruit in which the outer part of the pericarp becomes fleshy or softens like a berry, while the inner hardens like a nut, forming a stone with a kernel, as the plum, cherry, apricot, and peach.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Bot.) A fruit consisting of pulpy, coriaceous, or fibrous exocarp, without valves, containing a nut or stone with a kernel. The exocarp is succulent in the plum, cherry, apricot, peach, etc.; dry and subcoriaceous in the almond; and fibrous in the cocoanut.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A stone fruit.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun fleshy indehiscent fruit with a single seed: e.g. almond; peach; plum; cherry; elderberry; olive; jujube

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin drūpa, druppa, overripe olive, from Greek druppā, olive, possibly alteration of drupepēs, ripened on the tree : drūs, dru-, tree; see deru- in Indo-European roots + peptein, pep-, to ripen; see pekw- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Scientific Latin, from Latin drūpa, from Ancient Greek δρύππᾱ.

Examples

  • From wikipedia: In botany, a drupe is a fruit in which an outer fleshy part (exocarp, or skin; and mesocarp, or flesh) surrounds a shell (the pit or stone) of hardened endocarp with a seed inside.

    Please Don't Pass The Nuts™

  • It is, however, not the product "turpentine" that is most esteemed by the natives, but the fruit of the tree, a kind of drupe disposed in clusters.

    Scientific American Supplement, No. 288, July 9, 1881

  • Its leaves are shaped like spear-heads; the fruit is a kind of drupe, clothed in fleshy scales.

    The Castaways

  • Leaving aside the invidious choices to be made between hesperidia, cucurbitaceae, and drupes — I am a drupe man — and, thence, between apricots, nectarines, mangoes, plums, and peaches, I find there is simply no adequate counter-argument.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • Leaving aside the invidious choices to be made between hesperidia, cucurbitaceae, and drupes — I am a drupe man — and, thence, between apricots, nectarines, mangoes, plums, and peaches, I find there is simply no adequate counter-argument.

    The Peach

  • She pricked her hand on the rusty daglet, and I saw a drupe of blood, red as a cherry, swell on her pall.

    Wildfire

  • She pricked her hand on the rusty daglet, and I saw a drupe of blood, red as a cherry, swell on her pall.

    Wildfire

  • She pricked her hand on the rusty daglet, and I saw a drupe of blood, red as a cherry, swell on her pall.

    Wildfire

  • Yesterday, I woke in the middle of a dream about the cherry liqueur described by the protagonist Framboise in the book Five Quarters of the Orange *: eventually, the alcohol seeps through the drupe to penetrate the stone, drawing out the scent of almonds, she explains.

    Slow Sweet Sips

  • Yesterday, I woke in the middle of a dream about the cherry liqueur described by the protagonist Framboise in the book Five Quarters of the Orange *: eventually, the alcohol seeps through the drupe to penetrate the stone, drawing out the scent of almonds, she explains.

    Archive 2005-06-01

Comments

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  • A pistachio is in fact a drupe and not a true nut. Fascinating, yes?

    November 2, 2007

  • Yes!

    February 28, 2009