Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Inside information.
  • transitive verb To cause to become fatigued; tire.
  • noun An enclosed superstructure at the stern of a ship.
  • noun A poop deck.
  • transitive verb To break over the stern of (a ship). Used of a wave.
  • transitive verb To take (a wave) over the stern.
  • noun Excrement.
  • intransitive verb To defecate.
  • intransitive verb To defecate in (one's clothes or bed, for example).
  • noun A person regarded as very disagreeable.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun In architecture, a poppyhead.
  • Nautical, to break heavily over the stern or quarter of (a ship); drive in the stern of.
  • To trick; cheat; cozen.
  • noun An act of breaking wind.
  • noun The stern or aftermost part of a ship.
  • noun A deck above the ordinary deck in the aftermost part of a ship.
  • To break wind.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Naut.) A deck raised above the after part of a vessel; the hindmost or after part of a vessel's hull; also, a cabin covered by such a deck. See Poop deck, under deck. See also roundhouse.
  • noun (Arch.) See 2d poppy.
  • transitive verb To break over the poop or stern, as a wave.
  • transitive verb To strike in the stern, as by collision.
  • intransitive verb To make a noise; to pop; also, to break wind.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb intransitive To defecate.
  • noun The sound of a steam engine's whistle; typically low pitch.
  • noun US, dated information, facts.
  • noun The stern of a ship.
  • verb transitive To break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck.
  • verb transitive To ship over the stern
  • noun A slothful person.
  • noun A set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a stupid foolish person
  • noun obscene terms for feces
  • noun the rear part of a ship
  • noun slang terms for inside information

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Origin unknown.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Origin unknown.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English poupe, from Old French, from Latin puppis.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Possibly from obsolete poop, to break wind, from Middle English poupen, to blow a horn, toot, of imitative origin.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Perhaps short for nincompoop.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Origin uncertain, perhaps sound imitation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Origin uncertain, possibly from Middle English poupen.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Recorded since circa 1405, from Middle French poupe, from Italian poppa, from Latin puppis, all meaning "stern of a ship".

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Origin uncertain, perhaps a shortening of nincompoop.

Examples

Comments

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  • "The milkwhite dolphin tossed his mane and, rising in the golden poop, the helmsman spread the bellying sail upon the wind and stood off forward with all sail set, the spinnaker to larboard."

    Joyce, Ulysses, 12

    January 13, 2007

  • I just had a revelation concerning the word poop... it's a lousy noun but a kick-awesome verb.

    October 25, 2007

  • I'm so happy for you, uselessness. :-D

    October 25, 2007

  • I came across my absolute favorite usage of this word at work (I swear), because I had to replace it (in the phrase "poop deck") in a text having to do with the slave trade that was going to be read by a bunch of 5th-graders.

    You can see why it had to be replaced. The slave trade is not funny, but 10-year-olds would be so distracted by the word... anyway. Looking for when the meaning came to mean... you know... poop... I found this usage in the OED:

    c1744 in Oxf. Dict. Nursery Rhymes (1951) 372:

    Little Robin red breast,

    Sitting on a pole,

    Niddle, Noddle, Went his head,

    And Poop went his Hole.

    October 25, 2007

  • Wow, in that way it's almost onomatopoeic. *does that finger-in-cheek popping noise thing*

    October 25, 2007

  • I know that poem!

    Good grief; why am I admitting that?

    October 25, 2007

  • "Marilyn Manson says you should shoot your friends in the head with a gun! And everyone should eat babies! And rape their dead grandparents! And poop on a church!"

    - The Onion, January 31, 2001

    October 25, 2007

  • I bet that nursery rhyme is about impalement.

    n.b. You took the poop out of poop deck, CB?! For shame!

    October 25, 2007

  • Oh come on, it's not about impalement. Robins' heads *always* go "Niddle, Noddle." Listen next time you see a robin, and just SEE if you don't hear those exact words (with that exact punctuation).

    I admit, I did take the poop out of poop deck. Or, not really, since the original sentence read something like, "Men were fed on the quarterdeck, women and children on the poop."

    I remember it didn't even say poop deck, which changed its meaning entirely (from a modern perspective).

    October 25, 2007

  • Gross. Never, never feed me on the poop.

    October 25, 2007