seanahan has looked up 26 words, created 14 lists, listed 543 words, written 2956 comments, added 75 tags, and loved 22 words.

Comments by seanahan

  • I feel like this is a necessary word, and from the twitter feed, it seems that others agree. Example

    The newly depoped Catholic church is about to begin the frantic process by which it enpopes itself.

    As always, it is pronounced, də-POPED.

    March 1, 2013

  • Fear of the dodecahedron. Useful to mix in when giving a list of other, normal phobias.

    December 12, 2010

  • This word feels very British. There is an American sense that the British treat all subjects with equal gravitas, including things we would fine to be worthless.

    June 27, 2010

  • Thanks nearsounds. In the early days, there was quite a competition to have the "most words". I never thought that was a good idea. These are my words because they mean something to me. Words are like friends. You can have a lot of them, but you only have a few good ones you are really close to.

    May 27, 2010

  • I read it last year and it was amazing. The breadth and depth was astonishing. Whether you are a fan of science fiction, fantasy, politics, history, science, or philosophy, there is something for you. There is even some fun word stuff.

    January 2, 2010

  • I never give any thought to the boundaries of my book reading. I rarely ever take more than a week to read a book, so it probably does come up that often. I think I read Cryptonomicon across New Year's last year.

    December 31, 2009

  • From Wikipedia, it says the etymology is from the "Montagnais word meaning "snowshoe-netter", and the Inuit Circumpolar Conference used both Inuit and Eskimo. So apparently you are allowed to say Eskimo without offense.

    December 31, 2009

  • I would say it (geo-DESsy) or (gee-AH-duh-see), but it looks like the Odyssey pronunciation is deemed "correct".

    December 31, 2009

  • Those words use the Greek cosmos which refers to order, or generally the universe as a whole. So your idea of cosm is pretty similar to that meaning.

    December 31, 2009

  • I don't think I can take a band seriously whose leader is an anagram of the band name.

    December 31, 2009

  • All over Ireland probably. Sionnach would know.

    December 31, 2009

  • It can be a crutch for a writer who isn't good enough to convey the ambiance of a foreign land.

    December 30, 2009

  • Bilby, is it the job of the Supreme Court to facilitate acknowledgment of racism?

    December 30, 2009

  • My chief objection is that I don't find these words particularly "beautiful". It can't be a measure of the inherit nature of the concept, because of hush, so it must be from the sounds?

    December 21, 2009

  • Many people believe that a hate crime is worse than a crime, and I assume the laws in this case are such. The point is, is murder for racism worse that murder for fun?

    December 21, 2009

  • In America, I would say that settler has a generally positive connotation.

    December 21, 2009

  • We have a true mystery on our hands. It certainly seems like some of the expressions are crazier than others. The Native American would be from Washington state, which is way outside the bounds of where it was used. The Yiddish also seems ridiculous. French is somewhat reasonable, especially given the usage in Louisiana by people like Satchmo. Without finding some 19th century writing (very unlikely), we will never know.

    December 21, 2009

  • My question is, who cares if he was racist? He should go to jail, both as punishment for his crime, and as a deterrent to others who might commit similar crimes. It's not illegal to hate an entire race, but it is illegal to attack them.

    December 21, 2009

  • Even in small print I read this as surf-line the first time. I can't imagine any native English speaker actually linking that fline is an acceptable morpheme.

    December 21, 2009

  • Uselessness, that does actually sound kind of ethnocentric to me. I bet the Hawaiians think we went out of way to have too many hard to pronounce sounds. I would be interested to find out if the languages with "clicks" are closer to each other than all other languages (evolutionarily speaking, a clade), or if that has arisen independently multiple times.

    December 21, 2009

  • Yes, but guns make us safer.

    November 10, 2009

  • From googling, it appears that "pod" is the more common term for narwhals. As with all of the exhaltation of larks, these are highly subjective and people like us are constantly coming up with new ones. All it takes (especially with the internet) is for someone to come up with a good one and have the meme catch on.

    November 6, 2009

  • I'm trying to unravel the picaresque pun.

    November 6, 2009

  • "I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us...We need the kind of books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us." - Kafka

    October 31, 2009

  • That's quite a stretch.

    October 31, 2009

  • The word fabulist still has some zing.

    October 31, 2009

  • see seidel for citation.

    October 31, 2009

  • Plus one for victualry.

    October 31, 2009

  • In common American parlance, they are use interchangeably.

    October 26, 2009

  • This is an important thought experiment, because it raises numerous questions about the nature of language, knowledge, and intelligence. Given that language is combinatorial, there are more possible utterances than could be stored in the brain, we must have rules to generate language. For a computer to "understand" language, it must have some sort of what to generate new utterances.

    Unfortunately, David Cole doesn't seem to grasp the intricacies of this, and completely misinterprets what Searle's argument actually is.

    October 19, 2009

  • The scarier thing is to come up with something which I think is endlessly witty and rush to Wordie to post it, only to realize that I myself posted it two years ago. I don't look forward to my dotage.

    October 19, 2009

  • I would say very rare; it seems the author forgot the word posterity.

    October 19, 2009

  • It's conversations like this that make me love Wordie.

    October 19, 2009

  • and, I'll play the clarinet
    use clam shells for castanets
    we play with our bags on our shoulders
    my sweet lady lioness

    October 19, 2009

  • I think that would make a good first line to a poem.

    October 19, 2009

  • It isn't trepidation on my part John. I've been off the grid for 96 hours and I returned to Wordie to only 3 pages of comments. We need to start up some new puzzles or contests.

    October 12, 2009

  • The dictionary definitions seem to disagree with WordNet. They seem to have a connotation of someone who goes around town partying, as opposed to just visiting.

    October 9, 2009

  • Doesn't this encompass most types of elections?

    October 8, 2009

  • "No one is born a baitman, I don't think, but the rings of Saturn sing epithalamium the sea-beasts dower." -- Roger Zelazny, "The Doors of His Face, The Lamps of his Mouth"

    October 6, 2009

  • The etymology appears to be madeupical.

    October 6, 2009

  • unexplodable, perhaps?

    October 6, 2009

  • It appears that libational is the adjectival form.

    October 5, 2009

  • I'd say the "standard" option could do what you wanted. As for pronunciation, Americans would all probably know the correct pronunciation, but in casual speech let the vowel be shortened.

    October 5, 2009

  • This sounds to me like someone simulates eating. Perhaps it could be used to describe bulimia.

    October 5, 2009

  • It's pretty funny, because accountants deal with digits, numbers, not fingers, but the parallel is etymologically obvious. If they used the original word, it would be a clever pun on moving the digits around to mean what they wanted. Instead you have this ugly word that no one will ever use.

    October 5, 2009

  • This word is awful.

    October 2, 2009

  • The greatest of the language mavens.

    September 28, 2009

  • Also a GNU package.

    September 28, 2009

  • Calm down Sarah, different people can spell names different ways. I too know what it is to have a name that is spelled a number of different ways, but you can't tell people that they are spelling their name wrong.

    September 28, 2009

  • How will the links between pages work in Wordnikie? I like the current system of brackets in Wordie, but perhaps a more expressive system could be made. It would be nice to link to the Wordnik page normally, or to link to the comments section when referencing another comment, as well as to have special ways to reference lists or tags.

    September 28, 2009

  • I think we should change the pronunciation of these word to actually use the sound in question. Schwə.

    September 28, 2009

  • Is this really any different that "What are you fucking doing?"

    September 28, 2009

  • Is this a British slang?

    September 21, 2009

  • I'd never heard this word before and when reading the entry on anecdotic thought of it. Apparently I'm not the first.

    September 20, 2009

  • Similar connotation to anarchist? Or does this have more of a anti-technological meaning?

    September 20, 2009

  • Often followed by brah, which is I think a weird way to say bro.

    September 20, 2009

  • selection bias.

    September 17, 2009

  • I have a lot of statistics, but I still find myself using random colloquially to mean a variety of things. Sometimes I refer to things as stochastic just to mix it up.

    September 17, 2009

  • I feel like unholy can be used to describe a lot of stuff, but ungodly is typically used to describe time.

    September 17, 2009

  • Monovocalic, yet all of vowels are pronounced differently. Is there a tag for that?

    September 15, 2009

  • I often see "The Next Big Thing™" used in an ironic way.

    September 14, 2009

  • The power of dictionaries illustrated. Adele's Chasing Pavements banned from certain U.S. radio stations, basically because somebody posted a made up definition of the term on Urban Dictionary. that is was slang for analingus.

    September 11, 2009

  • I don't mind foreign words, especially those which have cool etymological connections to English. What I don't really care for is scrolling through pages of comments of simple definitions in characters I don't recognize. These unfortunately just end up being background noise to me, and distract from my real mission, which is to read all the awesome comments. I don't think much would be lost by having some segregation between different languages. As for numbers, dates, punctuation, etc., those could remain in a language neutral section, or be tagged multiply for all languages where they are valid.

    September 11, 2009

  • The common connotation of psycho makes this unfortunate.

    September 11, 2009

  • See also croupier.

    September 11, 2009

  • Huh?

    September 9, 2009

  • This is very interesting, because pronouncing it makes it clear it is "to-ward and fro-ward", each pronounced with two syllables, and giving us the etymology of toward. It is rather a simple etymology, but due to its prepositional nature, I never thought about it.

    September 9, 2009

  • That tenet seems to inform us as to why he is an "ex".

    September 9, 2009

  • A webpage that is very busy. Unfortunately, business is already taken.

    September 9, 2009

  • You're not joking about the busy-ness of that page, wowza. Hopefully we can figure out a way to keep the minimalist approach.

    September 9, 2009

  • The episode titled "That's Lobstertainment!" is about Dr. Zoidberg, a failed stand-up comic, and his washed up silent hologram star uncle, Harold Zoid, named from the silent movie star Harold Lloyd.

    September 4, 2009

  • It just doesn't seem fair to include simple prefixation in his word count, especially since there were so many words he deserves full credit for.

    September 3, 2009

  • "in" is a fairly productive prefix, and it surely must have existed in Shakespeare's time. Is it fair to credit Shakespeare with it, even if it is first attested in his play?

    September 2, 2009

  • You're sitting on a gold mine Trebek.

    September 2, 2009

  • see CCFCCP.

    September 2, 2009

  • Apparently there are a lot of h4x0rs on Wordie.

    September 2, 2009

  • Now my brain is stuck on porpoise christi.

    September 2, 2009

  • tooty fruity.

    September 1, 2009

  • Also a character in the movie Hackers.

    August 28, 2009

  • Is this British?

    August 27, 2009

  • You remember madeupical words from 20 years ago? Or you first used it back then?

    August 27, 2009

  • Looking at Project Gutenberg, I find

    Stephen Dedalus, displeased and sleepy, leaned
    his arms on the top of the staircase and looked coldly at the shaking gurgling face that blessed him, equine in its length, and at the light untonsured hair, grained and hued like pale oak.


    A choir gives back menace and echo, assisting about the altar's horns, the snorted Latin of jackpriests moving burly in their albs, tonsured and oiled and gelded, fat with the fat of kidneys of wheat.

    August 26, 2009

  • A very litigious town.

    August 21, 2009

  • Hussein is a very common name in the Middle East, the King of Jordan, for example. Maybe that has something to do with it.

    August 21, 2009

  • It should probably be "failed theory" or something like that.

    August 21, 2009

  • Anybody know the etymology of this? I first heard this from Faith of BtVS.

    August 21, 2009

  • What is a "(rubbish) tip"?

    August 19, 2009

  • Yes, but it's all natural.

    August 19, 2009

  • So gooooood.

    August 19, 2009

  • Wow, that pronunciation is really jarring, I've never heard it said like that before. I'm not sure if it is a British thing or a comic thing.

    August 18, 2009

  • Famously, the Jeff Goldblum death rumor.

    August 17, 2009

  • More disappointingly, his number is 28, and not 47, which would give him an awesome nickname and sell a bunch of jerseys.

    August 17, 2009

  • See also thane, a freeman granted land by the king for military service, or a baron/lord in Scotland.

    August 17, 2009

  • Uh, I think logophile is the English translation.

    August 17, 2009

  • There has to be a better word for this.

    August 17, 2009

  • This word is ugly and non-obvious. Also, it seems like it might be somewhat offensive to people.

    August 17, 2009

  • The shinbone's connected to the kneebone.

    August 17, 2009

  • Again, WordNet is NOT a dictionary. It seems to be saying this is a synonym for stomach, which is reasonable.

    August 17, 2009

  • Uh, alleviate is a verb, so it has no quantity. I think that "every word" means "every noun" in that sentence.

    August 17, 2009

  • I think that would be good graces.

    August 8, 2009

  • UD is a homeless man's Wordie.

    August 5, 2009

  • Does this word really exist? It occurs quite a bit, but the general consensus is that understanding is always correct.

    August 3, 2009

  • See frigor.

    July 29, 2009

  • Thus frozen to death is frigor mortis.

    July 29, 2009

  • See also philologist.

    July 29, 2009

  • What does this mean though?

    July 27, 2009

  • Based on the movie "The Magnificent Seven".

    July 25, 2009

  • Step 3: Profit

    July 25, 2009

  • Really? That's the best the boys at Harvard could come up with?

    July 25, 2009

  • In rod we trust.

    July 25, 2009

  • This is general sports jargon. I've heard it used with regards to several sports.

    July 25, 2009

  • This is from the Greek, meaning opposite feet. On a sphere, people on the other side will be upside down, with their feet the opposite way of yours.

    July 23, 2009

  • Really? Hater? You're attaching a lot of connotation to this one.

    July 23, 2009

  • Actually, Lucifer is considered to be the "Day Star", and often "Light bringer". You only consider him "dark", because of the popular black/evil white/good conception.

    July 23, 2009

  • How is this different from pre-emptive attack?

    July 17, 2009

  • etymoline says it's from the write.

    July 17, 2009

  • I think some people are descended from bears.

    July 17, 2009

  • That's a silly argument, you'll end up with things like ghoti.

    July 17, 2009

  • Wow, she died young. Also, should you be calling a 6 year old an idiot?

    July 17, 2009

  • Also the name of a movie.

    July 17, 2009

  • It should be a "person who works in a job..."

    July 17, 2009

  • So what do people think about the phrase moist panties?

    July 10, 2009

  • Ah Bilby, the Axlotl is not from the sea, but lives in a lake.

    July 10, 2009

  • I don't think I've ever heard this word in America, except when watching the British show Coupling.

    July 10, 2009

  • And of course this Supergroup is composed only of the best and brightest members of those phyla.

    July 10, 2009

  • Bg5.

    July 8, 2009

  • Is Lisa gonna marry a carrot?

    July 8, 2009

  • To put that more succinctly, "Get off my lawn!"

    July 8, 2009

  • Does this mean that astronomers have a subtle distinction between explodable and explosive?

    July 8, 2009

  • I think this should be a compound, or at least hyphenated.

    July 8, 2009

  • Actually, since the axlotl is a salamander, there was not pun.

    July 8, 2009

  • link?

    July 3, 2009

  • I'm here, but there isn't anything.

    July 1, 2009

  • I heard this as "Murphy's Law applied".

    July 1, 2009

  • I disagree strenuously. It has always been Gen xer.

    July 1, 2009

  • Where did the r come from?

    July 1, 2009

  • Often referred to as a confidence game, right?

    July 1, 2009

  • I think there are some who would say that moist is more disgusting.

    July 1, 2009

  • Which word are you referring to?

    You probably want to add that comment to the comment section for the specific word, not this list.

    June 25, 2009

  • Not to be confused with rococcochromatic.

    June 25, 2009

  • Is there any regime that has lasted forever? What is the longest continuing government in the world? Pretty much every country I can think of in Europe has abandoned the monarchy in the last two hundred years. Most of Asia has undergone significant changes since World War I (or II). Africa can't have that many stable regimes, most have probably been overturned in the last half century. One could argue that all governments are inherently unstable.

    June 25, 2009

  • Shevek, I think you need to know about something about the internet in general, and somewhat here at Wordie. We abhor censorship. There is no better way than to get people to say and write something than to tell them to stop.

    June 23, 2009

  • Used frequently in statistics as well.

    June 23, 2009

  • I hear this in Texas all the time.

    June 23, 2009

  • When I get really angry, I will often type off long ranting posts. When I was younger, I would send them, but these days just the typing is cathartic enough and I usually just close the window.

    June 23, 2009

  • Very similar to filial.

    June 18, 2009

  • Ick. What if they have a regular phone keypad?

    June 18, 2009

  • I've been saying it over and over again, but I don't really think I stress either syllable. There might be a slightly stronger stress on the second, but not by much.

    June 18, 2009

  • See kenning, (I didn't know this).

    June 17, 2009

  • A Brazilian language.

    June 17, 2009

  • Apparently we've lost the bleeps, the sweeps, and the creeps.

    June 15, 2009

  • I like Twitter, I think it is a good idea, if properly used. Just like blogs Twitter is a medium that can be very effective and useful, as well as crazy and annoying. It is the nomenclature that upsets me. Twit is an insult, and for a while there were a lot of passed tense twat jokes which were mildly amusing. A tweet is a noise a bird makes, and in college when I tried to pass out drunk at 4 in the morning the birds kept me awake. Add to that all of the really awful portmanteau words like this, and the fact that the twit prefix has become relatively productive in a short period of time and the whole twitter phenomenon needs to die and be resurrected with a new name.

    June 15, 2009

  • Kant is perplexing in all seasons, which makes sense, given that he is known for critiquing the idea of reasonable arguments.

    June 15, 2009

  • Occasionally used as a humorous plural of box, especially when referring to a computer as a box. As in, "I have two Linux boxen in my apartment."

    June 14, 2009

  • Even reading the definition I'm not sure quite what this means.

    June 14, 2009

  • Is this an old usage? I would say cardsharp, although the current terminology would probably be hustler, or in poker jargon, a mechanic.

    June 14, 2009

  • From Eos, Greek goddess of dawn.

    June 14, 2009

  • Apparently this was avoided, which is good, and we can all forget this abomination of a word.

    June 14, 2009

  • Be careful to remember that the female of the species is more deadly than the male.

    June 14, 2009

  • Is this like dine and dash?

    June 14, 2009

  • Apparently I can't tag this page, but I was going to tag vomit inducing.

    June 14, 2009

  • It's not in the dictionary because no one ever uses it. Also because it is really more than is necessary to describe an act that can be fairly easily described in English.

    June 14, 2009

  • When I was first learning Spanish, my Mom asked me to speak it to a fluent neighbor, and the only thing I could think of was "levanta los manos", which he (jokingly) took to mean I was attempting to rob him.

    June 14, 2009

  • Don't worry, all of the people who truly get such things are breathlessly awaiting the The 1,048,576th word in the English language.

    June 14, 2009

  • Mollusque, most of my books are about words, or at least, word oriented. At least, they contain mostly words, so I assume that is related to the subject.

    June 14, 2009

  • Dude, you are so fruct.

    June 13, 2009

  • I still blame it on the vampires.

    June 13, 2009

  • Sorry, I stand corrected.

    June 10, 2009

  • Also, "a long lone way to go".

    June 10, 2009

  • Requires a manssiere.

    June 10, 2009

  • It is.

    June 10, 2009

  • Does homo sapiens sapiens count?

    June 10, 2009

  • Not to be confused with diurnal.

    June 10, 2009

  • Or in England, demobilize.

    June 10, 2009

  • I'm almost three times that age and if I visited my parents wearing that shirt my Mom would slap me.

    June 10, 2009

  • I'm just waiting for this to come up on Fox or MSNBC after recent newsworthy events.

    June 10, 2009

  • Very interesting etymology from etymonline, "acronym for Fliegerabwehrkanone 'airplane defense cannon.'"

    June 5, 2009

  • Someone who is an expert is creating madeupical words.

    June 2, 2009

  • It's actually madeupicalist.

    June 2, 2009

  • I can come up with another reason for you to do so Bilby. Or you can wait until Summer.

    June 2, 2009

  • Agreed, stabby comes to mind.

    May 31, 2009

  • This is a strange word.

    May 31, 2009

  • Wait whoop? I pronounce this with a w.

    May 31, 2009

  • Yes, because iPhone itself was already trademarked by Cisco.

    May 30, 2009

  • I'm not too wild about this one, it seems unlikely that they made a million dollars.

    May 30, 2009

  • A fairly common mistake for ergonomic, but I like to think it is a combination of ergonomic and aerodynamic.

    May 30, 2009

  • A bandanna worn over the top of the head. Image search is useful here.

    May 27, 2009

  • I'm not entirely certain what this means.

    May 27, 2009

  • Don't forget bakers. Oh wait, they advocate base thirteen.

    May 27, 2009

  • If we had to pick which Wordie posted a comment containing "groin-locked couples enact rapid-speed dry-humping", would anyone have picked Bilby?

    May 27, 2009

  • Anybody remember which day of the week this is supposed to be?

    May 27, 2009

  • Also, this should be affectionate slang for the Midianites.

    May 27, 2009

  • I like the definition, but this sounds too much like you're calling me a birdbrain.

    Edit: I indeed do know which of the two toos to use.

    May 26, 2009

  • It's a metaphoric sense. It's outdated, but I've heard it.

    May 26, 2009

  • autocorrelation, heteroscedasticity

    May 26, 2009

  • Often used in linguistics to illustrate the difficulty of understanding languages.

    May 26, 2009

  • It means to make one salivate.

    May 26, 2009

  • That's a particularly unerudite way to learn it.

    May 26, 2009

  • It's in there. Something is weird with the way they are ordering the definitions from the raw WordNet data.

    May 26, 2009

Comments for seanahan

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  • "Almost 4 years ago" you added some wonderful quotations from The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, and I just wanted to say thank you. Thank you.

    June 28, 2011

  • You cannot escape the charge that you have previously engaged in the amazing pastime that is IDENTIFY THE WORDIE.
    You are therefore prime target material for inviting to IDENTIFY THE WORDIENIK.
    The whole of the bit of Wordnik that joins in on this would be truly honoured should you participate this time round.
    Easily find the right page right now because it is currently the most commented on list shown on the Community page.

    April 14, 2011

  • "Sean has created 14 lists, listed 542 words, written 2,995 comments, and added 75 tags, 22 favorites, and 0 pronunciations."

    September 10, 2010

  • I read it last year and it was amazing. The breadth and depth was astonishing. Whether you are a fan of science fiction, fantasy, politics, history, science, or philosophy, there is something for you. There is even some fun word stuff.

    January 2, 2010

  • seanahan, have you read Stephenson's Baroque Trilogy? Recommended. I read Anathem last Spring and really enjoyed it. Very different direction for him. The guy's amazing...

    January 2, 2010

  • I played with your name. 

    October 2, 2009

  • nice comments re "gaytarded." When we hold a word up to the light, it can lose its frightful character or perhaps provoke new, meaningful insights. A word is just a grouping of letters and has no power beyond what we assign to it. This is one of the underpinnings of semantics. I am with you.

    August 28, 2008

  • Seanahan, I saw that you were rather stung by the comment I made on the word gaytarded. I apologize for any hurt I caused you, which was not my intention in the least. I explain this more fully in a recent comment to the problematic word.

    August 26, 2008

  • Hi. Would you like to be on Identify the Wordie #2? You'll need to email identifythewordie@yours.com with your Wordie nick and the single word that best describes you. Cheers!

    July 27, 2008

  • Hi dude! Perhaps in the 'more about' seanahan box you could put a link to your blog. The 'also on' Blogger link dead-ends at a Profile Not Available page. And I like reading your blog!

    December 23, 2007

  • Greetings, Seanahan:

    Intelligencer, apart from featuring as the title of certain newspapers, can also mean an informer or spy.

    November 29, 2007

  • Hi Seanahan,

    I tend to invent words when i write short stories, if you visit my site and read e.g. Gruha's Snitzagraab, you'll get some prehistoric words.

    xoox

    November 20, 2007

  • Awesome, thanks for your comment re Decemberists words.

    October 29, 2007

  • I wonder who's kissing her now. :)

    October 19, 2007

  • I have no idea what that is in reference to.

    September 27, 2007

  • Late response: I've heard engine pronounced with the first syllable as 'in'; 'ingine'. Most bizarre.

    September 26, 2007

  • Slumry, you can eliminate the "extras" by clicking on edit under each one. Then you'll see an option to delete. Unless, that is, you prefer the repetition. :-)

    June 13, 2007

  • Cudgel, cudgel cudgel. . .
    Actually, the repetition was inadvertant--I just stumbled on this site today; obviously, I am not yet adept in using it!

    Now that I think about it, though, it seems appropriate--repetition seems inherent in the word's meaning.

    June 13, 2007

  • Hey, check out WordPlay's profile!

    February 11, 2007

  • re: click 'n clack; i understand where you're coming from. they are clever letter concatenations that amuse me. they may go away, they may not. for the nonce, there they are and there they are...

    i've renamed the list: 'pseudonyms:what's in a name?' if i get complaints, i'll consider deep-six-ing it.

    December 14, 2006

  • Thanks, I'll have to check this book out.

    December 10, 2006

  • re: "how do you get the number from the word"--"momgal" stands for 15-cubed = 3375. it comes from a system i found in the book "mathemagics" by arthur benjamin et al. on pg. 118. you'll find the nonsense sentence i've listed in wordie for 25 decimal places for pi in there as well. basically it's based on phonetics: t,d-sounds=1;n-sound=2;m-sound=3;r-sound=4;L-sound=5;J-sound=6;k-sound=7;f,v-sounds=8; p,b-sounds=9;s,z-sound=0.

    there's a clever association given each for mnemonic purposes: "t" has a single shaft; "n" has two; "m" has three; "r" is the last letter in "four"; "L" is the shape between thumb and forefinger of the open 5-fingered hand; "j" is shaped like a six; part of "k" is shaped like a seven; "f" in cursive resembles eight; "P" is a backwards nine and zero begins with the "z" or "s" sound. there you have it. i can recommend the book: part of my permanent library.

    December 9, 2006