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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A circular band of metal or wood put around a cask or barrel to bind the staves together.
  • n. A large wooden, plastic, or metal ring, especially one used as a plaything or for trained animals to jump through.
  • n. One of the lightweight circular supports for a hoop skirt.
  • n. A circular, ringlike earring.
  • n. One of a pair of circular wooden or metal frames used to hold material taut for embroidery or similar needlework.
  • n. Basketball The basket.
  • n. Basketball A field goal: hit a big hoop.
  • n. Basketball The game of basketball.
  • n. Sports A croquet wicket.
  • transitive v. To hold together or support with or as if with a hoop.
  • transitive v. To encircle.
  • idiom jump To undergo a rigorous trial or examination.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A circular band of metal used to bind a barrel.
  • n. The game of basketball.
  • n. A hoop earring.
  • v. To fasten using a hoop.
  • n. A shout; a whoop, as in whooping cough.
  • n. The hoopoe.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A pliant strip of wood or metal bent in a circular form, and united at the ends, for holding together the staves of casks, tubs, etc.
  • n. A ring; a circular band; anything resembling a hoop, as the cylinder (cheese hoop) in which the curd is pressed in making cheese.
  • n. A circle, or combination of circles, of thin whalebone, metal, or other elastic material, used for expanding the skirts of ladies' dresses; crinoline; -- used chiefly in the plural.
  • n. A quart pot; -- so called because originally bound with hoops, like a barrel. Also, a portion of the contents measured by the distance between the hoops.
  • n. An old measure of capacity, variously estimated at from one to four pecks.
  • n. A shout; a whoop, as in whooping cough.
  • n. The hoopoe. See Hoopoe.
  • intransitive v. To utter a loud cry, or a sound imitative of the word, by way of call or pursuit; to shout.
  • intransitive v. To whoop, as in whooping cough. See Whoop.
  • transitive v. To bind or fasten with hoops.
  • transitive v. To clasp; to encircle; to surround.
  • transitive v. To drive or follow with a shout.
  • transitive v. To call by a shout or peculiar cry.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bind or fasten with a hoop or with hoops; provide with a hoop: as, to hoop a barrel or puncheon.
  • To clasp; encircle; surround.
  • n. A circular band or flattened ring of wood, metal, or other material; especially, a band of wood or metal used to confine the staves of casks, tubs, etc., or for any similar purpose; also, that part of a finger-ring which surrounds the finger, as distinguished from the chaton.
  • n. A large ring of wood or iron for a child to trundle.
  • n. A circular band of stiff material serving to expand the skirt of a woman's dress: often used, either in the singular or in the plural, for the skirt itself so expanded.
  • n. Something resembling a hoop; anything circular: technically applied in botany to the overlapping edge of one of the valves of the frustule of the Diatomaceæ.
  • n. A certain quantity of drink, up to the first hoop on a quart pot (which was formerly bound with hoops like a barrel).
  • n. An old English measure of capacity, variously estimated at from 1 to 4 pecks.
  • n. The casing inclosing a pair of millstones; also, a reinforcing band about one of the stones.
  • n. Same as whoop.
  • n. Same as hoopoe.
  • n. A bullfinch.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. horizontal circular metal hoop supporting a net through which players try to throw the basketball
  • n. a light curved skeleton to spread out a skirt
  • n. a small arch used as croquet equipment
  • v. bind or fasten with a hoop
  • n. a rigid circular band of metal or wood or other material used for holding or fastening or hanging or pulling

Etymologies

Middle English hop.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English hoop, hoope, from Old English hōp ("mound, raised land", in combination, also "circular object"), from Proto-Germanic *hōpan (“bend, bow, arch”) (compare Dutch hoep), from Proto-Indo-European *kāb- (“to bend”) (compare Lithuanian kabė ("hook"), Old Church Slavic  (kǫpŭ, "hill, island")). More at camp. (Wiktionary)

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