Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Something that weighs down or oppresses; a burden.
  • intransitive verb To fall straight down; plunge.
  • intransitive verb To decline suddenly and steeply.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To weight with plummets, or as with plummets.
  • noun A piece of lead or other metal attached to a line, used in sounding the depth of water, determining the vertical, etc.
  • noun An instrument used by carpenters, masons, and others in adjusting erections to a vertical line; a plumb-rule.
  • noun The pommel or knob on the hilt of a sword.
  • noun A weight.
  • noun A piece of lead formerly used by school-boys to rule paper for writing.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A piece of lead attached to a line, used in sounding the depth of water.
  • noun A plumb bob or a plumb line. See under Plumb, n.
  • noun Hence, any weight.
  • noun A piece of lead formerly used by school children to rule paper for writing.
  • noun a line with a plummet; a sounding line.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic A piece of lead attached to a line, used in sounding the depth of water.
  • noun archaic A plumb bob or a plumb line.
  • noun archaic Hence, any weight.
  • noun archaic A piece of lead formerly used by school children to rule paper for writing
  • noun a plummet line, a line with a plummet; a sounding line.
  • noun Violent or dramatic fall
  • noun figuratively decline; fall; drop
  • verb intransitive To drop swiftly, in a direct manner; to fall quickly.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb drop sharply
  • noun the metal bob of a plumb line

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English plomet, from Old French, ball of lead, diminutive of plom, plomb, sounding lead, from Latin plumbum.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English plommet ("ball of lead", "plumb of a bob-line"), recorded since 1382, from Old French plommet or plomet, the diminutive of plom, plum ("lead", "sounding lead"), from Latin plumbum ("lead"). The verb is first recorded in 1626, originally meaning "to fathom, take soundings", from the noun.

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.