Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To have and keep in one's grasp.
  • intransitive verb To aim or direct; point.
  • intransitive verb To keep from falling or moving; support.
  • intransitive verb To sustain the pressure of.
  • intransitive verb To keep from departing or getting away.
  • intransitive verb To keep in custody.
  • intransitive verb To retain (one's attention or interest).
  • intransitive verb To avoid letting out or expelling.
  • intransitive verb To be filled by; contain.
  • intransitive verb To be capable of holding: synonym: contain.
  • intransitive verb To have as a chief characteristic or quality.
  • intransitive verb To have in store.
  • intransitive verb To have and maintain in one's possession.
  • intransitive verb To have as a responsible position or a privilege.
  • intransitive verb To have in recognition of achievement or superiority.
  • intransitive verb To maintain control over.
  • intransitive verb To maintain occupation of by force or coercion.
  • intransitive verb To withstand the efforts or advance of (an opposing team, for example).
  • intransitive verb To maintain in a given condition, situation, or action.
  • intransitive verb To impose control or restraint on; curb.
  • intransitive verb To stop the movement or progress of.
  • intransitive verb To reserve or keep back from use.
  • intransitive verb To defer the immediate handling of.
  • intransitive verb To own or have title to.
  • intransitive verb To be in possession of, whether legally entitled or not.
  • intransitive verb To bind by a contract.
  • intransitive verb To adjudge or decree.
  • intransitive verb To make accountable; obligate.
  • intransitive verb To keep in the mind or convey as a judgment, conviction, or point of view.
  • intransitive verb To assert or affirm, especially formally.
  • intransitive verb To regard in a certain way.
  • intransitive verb To cause to take place; carry on.
  • intransitive verb To assemble for and conduct the activity of; convene.
  • intransitive verb To carry or support (the body or a bodily part) in a certain position.
  • intransitive verb To cover (the ears or the nose, for example) especially for protection.
  • intransitive verb To maintain a grasp or grip on something.
  • intransitive verb To stay securely fastened.
  • intransitive verb To maintain a desired or accustomed position or condition.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English holden, from Old English healdan.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Alteration (influenced by hold) of Middle English hole, husk, hull of a ship, from Old English hulu; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English hold, holde, from Old English hold ("gracious, friendly, kind, favorable, true, faithful, loyal, devout, acceptable, pleasant"), from Proto-Germanic *hulþaz (“favourable, gracious, loyal”), from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (“to tend, incline, bend, tip”). Cognate with German hold ("gracious, friendly, sympathetic, grateful"), Danish and Swedish huld ("fair, kindly, gracious"), Icelandic hollur ("faithful, dedicated, loyal"), German Huld ("grace, favour").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Alteration (due to hold) of hole. Cognate with Dutch hol ("hole, cave, den, cavity, cargo hold").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English holden, from Old English healdan, from Proto-Germanic *haldanan ‘to tend, herd’, from Proto-Indo-European *kel- ‘to drive’ (compare Latin celer ("quick"), Tocharian B kälts ("to goad, drive"), Ancient Greek κέλλω (kellō, "to drive"), Sanskrit kaláyati ("he impels")). Cognate to West Frisian hâlde, Dutch houden, Low German holen, German halten, Danish holde.

Examples

    Sorry, no example sentences found.

Comments

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  • I use my phone's HOLD button to put callers into a submissive stupor of helplessness.

    October 15, 2008