Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To carry on through, despite hardships; undergo or suffer.
  • intransitive verb To put up with; tolerate.
  • intransitive verb To continue in existence; last.
  • intransitive verb To suffer patiently without yielding.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To make hard; harden; inure.
  • To preserve; keep.
  • To last or hold out against; sustain without impairment or yielding; support without breaking or giving way.
  • To bear with patience; bear up under without sinking or yielding, or without murmuring or opposition; put up with.
  • To undergo; suffer; sustain.
  • To continue or remain in; abide in.
  • Synonyms To brook, submit to, abide, tolerate, take patiently.
  • To become hard; harden.
  • To hold out; support adverse force or influence of any kind; suffer without yielding.
  • To continue; remain; abide.
  • To continue to exist; continue or remain in the same state without perishing; last; persist.
  • Synonyms To last, remain, continue, abide, bear, suffer, hold out.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To continue in the same state without perishing; to last; to remain.
  • intransitive verb To remain firm, as under trial or suffering; to suffer patiently or without yielding; to bear up under adversity; to hold out.
  • transitive verb To remain firm under; to sustain; to undergo; to support without breaking or yielding
  • transitive verb To bear with patience; to suffer without opposition or without sinking under the pressure or affliction; to bear up under; to put up with; to tolerate.
  • transitive verb obsolete To harden; to toughen; to make hardy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb intransitive To continue or carry on, despite obstacles or hardships.
  • verb transitive To tolerate or put up with something unpleasant.
  • verb intransitive To last.
  • verb transitive To suffer patiently.
  • verb obsolete To indurate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb face and withstand with courage
  • verb last and be usable
  • verb continue to live through hardship or adversity
  • verb continue to exist
  • verb put up with something or somebody unpleasant
  • verb persist for a specified period of time
  • verb undergo or be subjected to

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English enduren, from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrāre, to make hard : in-, against, into; see en– + dūrus, hard; see deru- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English enduren, from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrō ("to make hard"). Displaced Old English drēogan, which survives dialectally as dree.

Examples

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