Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To move on or ahead; proceed.
  • intransitive verb To extend; run.
  • intransitive verb To move by or in front of something.
  • intransitive verb To move past another vehicle.
  • intransitive verb To gain passage despite obstacles.
  • intransitive verb To move past in time; elapse.
  • intransitive verb To be transferred from one to another; circulate.
  • intransitive verb Sports To transfer a ball or puck to a teammate.
  • intransitive verb To be communicated or exchanged between persons.
  • intransitive verb To be transferred or conveyed to another by will or deed.
  • intransitive verb To undergo transition from one condition, form, quality, or characteristic to another.
  • intransitive verb To come to an end.
  • intransitive verb To cease to exist; die. Often used with on.
  • intransitive verb To happen; take place.
  • intransitive verb To be allowed to happen without notice or challenge.
  • intransitive verb Sports & Games To decline one's turn to bid, draw, bet, compete, or play.
  • intransitive verb To decline an offer.
  • intransitive verb To undergo an examination or a trial with favorable results.
  • intransitive verb To serve as a barely acceptable substitute.
  • intransitive verb To be accepted as a member of a group by denying one's own ancestry or background.
  • intransitive verb To be approved or adopted.
  • intransitive verb To make a decision.
  • intransitive verb To convey property to an heir or heirs.
  • intransitive verb Medicine To be discharged from a bodily part.
  • intransitive verb Sports To thrust or lunge in fencing.
  • intransitive verb To go by without stopping; proceed beyond or leave behind.
  • intransitive verb To go across; go through.
  • intransitive verb To allow to go by or elapse; spend.
  • intransitive verb To go by without paying attention to; disregard or ignore.
  • intransitive verb To fail to pay (a dividend).
  • intransitive verb To go beyond; surpass.
  • intransitive verb To undergo (a trial or examination) with favorable results.
  • intransitive verb To cause or allow to go through a trial, test, or examination successfully.
  • intransitive verb To cause to move.
  • intransitive verb To cause to move into a certain position.
  • intransitive verb To cause to move as part of a process.
  • intransitive verb To cause to go by.
  • intransitive verb To allow to cross a barrier.
  • intransitive verb Baseball To walk (a batter).
  • intransitive verb To maneuver (the bull) by means of a pase in bullfighting.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English passen, from Old French passer, from Vulgar Latin passāre, from Latin passus, step; see pace.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English pas, pase, pace, from passen ("to pass"). See the verb section, below.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Short for password.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English passen, from Old French passer ("to step, walk, pass"), from Vulgar Latin *passāre ("step, walk, pass"), from Latin passus ("a step"), pandere ("to spread, unfold, stretch"), from Proto-Indo-European *patno-, from Proto-Indo-European *pete- (“to spread, stretch out”). Cognate with Old English fæþm ("armful, fathom"). More at fathom.

Examples

  • However, on reflection, a few of us felt that system was too rigid, so we changed it once again, to pass,/pass*.

    PLIGG_Visual_Name - PLIGG_Visual_RSS_All

  • : UNLOCK echo Enter password to Unlock folder set/p "pass = >" if NOT % pass% = = type your password here goto FAIL attrib - h - s "Control Panel. {

    Yahoo! Answers: Latest Questions

  • If it was the latter, then Congress was either equally venturesome, or inattentive, because they let the phrase pass without comment.

    Alexander Hamilton, American

  • If it was the latter, then Congress was either equally venturesome, or inattentive, because they let the phrase pass without comment.

    Alexander Hamilton, American

  • Since most people really don't want to select a truly random password, where the letters and digits are mixed in a nonsense pattern, the term pass phrase is used to urge people to at least use several unrelated words in sequence as the pass phrase.

    FAQ: Alt.Security.PGP (Part II)

  • It was quite unthinkable to contemplate letting the title pass to a cousin, it seemed, however blameless and worthy he might be.

    Ungrateful Governess

  • A mountain pass is a place where the impossible becomes barely possible.

    Through Glacier Park: Seeing America First with Howard Eaton

  • In six speeches during the course of seven days, President Obama has hammered home his call for Congress to act on his $447 billion jobs plan, saying some version of the phrase "pass this bill" more than 100 times.

    ABC News: Top Stories

  • Fitzpatrick hit as he throws, pass is short for Lee Evans.

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  • Fitzpatrick hit as he throws, pass is short for Lee Evans.

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Comments

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  • There are many words for pass in the English-speaking world. In the United States, pass is very common in the West, the word gap is common in the southern Appalachians, notch in parts of New England, and saddle in northern Idaho. Scotland has the Gaelic term bealach (anglicised "balloch"), while Wales has the similar bwlch. In the Lake District of north-west England, the term hause is often used, although the term pass is also common—one distinction is that a pass can refer to a route, as well as the highest part thereof, while a hause is simply the highest part, often flattened somewhat into a high-level plateau.--Wikipedia

    June 1, 2018