Help support Wordnik by adopting your favorite word!

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To trade goods or services without the exchange of money.
  • transitive v. To trade (goods or services) without the exchange of money.
  • n. The act or practice of bartering.
  • n. Something bartered.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or being something based on bartering: a barter economy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. an equal exchange
  • v. exchange goods or services without involving money

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act or practice of trafficking by exchange of commodities; an exchange of goods.
  • n. The thing given in exchange.
  • intransitive v. To traffic or trade, by exchanging one commodity for another, in distinction from a sale and purchase, in which money is paid for the commodities transferred; to truck.
  • transitive v. To trade or exchange in the way of barter; to exchange (frequently for an unworthy consideration); to traffic; to truck; -- sometimes followed by away.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To traffic or trade by exchanging one commodity for another, in distinction from buying and selling for money.
  • To give (one thing or commodity) for another of equivalent or supposed equivalent value: with a person, for (formerly with) a thing: as, to barter one's jewels for bread.
  • To exchange, in general.
  • n. The act of exchanging; specifically, the act or practice of trafficking by exchange of commodities.
  • n. The thing given in exchange.
  • n. An arithmetical rule by which the values of different goods are ascertained and compared
  • n. Synonyms Dealing, trade, traffic, truck, interchange.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an equal exchange
  • v. exchange goods without involving money

Etymologies

Middle English barteren, probably from Old French barater; see barrator.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French barater, of uncertain origin (maybe Celtic). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.