Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To come next in time or succession; follow after another; replace another in an office or a position: She succeeded to the throne.
  • intransitive v. To accomplish something desired or intended: "Success is counted sweetest/By those who ne'er succeed” ( Emily Dickinson).
  • intransitive v. Obsolete To devolve upon a person by way of inheritance.
  • transitive v. To come after in time or order; follow.
  • transitive v. To come after and take the place of. See Synonyms at follow.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To follow in order; to come next after; hence, to take the place of.
  • v. To obtain the object desired; to accomplish what is attempted or intended; to have a prosperous issue or termination; to be successful.
  • v. To fall heir to; to inherit.
  • v. To come after; to be subsequent or consequent to; to follow; to pursue.
  • v. To support; to prosper; to promote.
  • v. To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; -- often with to.
  • v. Specifically: To ascend the throne after the removal the death of the occupant.
  • v. To descend, as an estate or an heirloom, in the same family; to devolve.
  • v. To go under cover.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To follow in order; to come next after; hence, to take the place of.
  • transitive v. To fall heir to; to inherit.
  • transitive v. To come after; to be subsequent or consequent to; to follow; to pursue.
  • transitive v. To support; to prosper; to promote.
  • intransitive v. To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; -- often with to.
  • intransitive v. To ascend the throne after the removal the death of the occupant.
  • intransitive v. To descend, as an estate or an heirloom, in the same family; to devolve.
  • intransitive v. To obtain the object desired; to accomplish what is attempted or intended; to have a prosperous issue or termination; to be successful.
  • intransitive v. To go under cover.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To follow; come after; be subsequent or consequent to.
  • To take the place of; be heir or successor to.
  • To fall heir to; inherit.
  • To prosper; give success to.
  • To follow; be subsequent; come after; come next; come in the place of another or of that which has preceded.
  • To become heir; take the place of one who has died; specifically, to ascend a throne after the removal or death of the occupant.
  • To come down by order of succession; descend; devolve.
  • To arrive at a happy issue; be successful in any endeavor; meet with success; obtain the object desired; accomplish what is attempted or intended.
  • To terminate according to desire; turn out successfully; have the desired result: as, his plan succeeded admirably.
  • To descend.
  • To approach by following.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. attain success or reach a desired goal
  • v. be the successor (of)

Etymologies

Middle English succeden, from Old French succeder, from Latin succēdere : sub-, near; see sub- + cēdere, to go; see ked- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French succeder, from Latin succedere ("to go under, go from under, come under, approach, follow, take the place of, receive by succession, prosper, be successful") (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Contronymic in the sense: win out vs. follow after (i.e., come in second--lose).

    January 27, 2007