Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To comprehend completely or correctly.
  • transitive v. To bring into reality; make real: He finally realized his lifelong ambition to learn how to play the violin.
  • transitive v. To make realistic: a film that realizes court life of the 17th century.
  • transitive v. To obtain or achieve, as gain or profit: She realized a substantial return on the investment.
  • transitive v. To bring in (a sum) as profit by sale.
  • intransitive v. To exchange holdings or goods for money.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To make real; to convert from the imaginary or fictitious into the actual; to bring into concrete existence; to accomplish.
  • v. To become aware of a fact or situation.
  • v. To cause to seem real; to impress upon the mind as actual; to feel vividly or strongly; to make one's own in apprehension or experience.
  • v. To acquire as an actual possession; to obtain as the result of plans and efforts; to gain; to get
  • v. To convert any kind of property into money, especially property representing investments, as shares, bonds, etc.
  • v. To convert into real property; to make real estate of.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To make real; to convert from the imaginary or fictitious into the actual; to bring into concrete existence; to effectuate; to accomplish.
  • transitive v. To cause to seem real; to impress upon the mind as actual; to feel vividly or strongly; to make one's own in apprehension or experience.
  • transitive v. To convert into real property; to make real estate of.
  • transitive v. To acquire as an actual possession; to obtain as the result of plans and efforts; to gain; to get.
  • transitive v. To convert into actual money.
  • intransitive v. To convert any kind of property into money, especially property representing investments, as shares in stock companies, bonds, etc.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To make or cause to become real; bring into existence or fact: as, to realize a project, or a dream of empire.
  • To perceive or comprehend the reality of; make real or distinct to one's self; recognize the real nature or the actual existence of: as, to realize the horrors of war; to realize one's danger or one's deficiencies.
  • To manifest as real or as a reality; exhibit the actual existence or character of; cause to appear real or distinct.
  • To bring or get into actual possession; make one's own; clear as a profit or gain; obtain a return of: as, to realize a fortune from speculation.
  • To bring into form for actual or ready use; exchange for cash or ready means: as, to realize one's stock or securities.
  • To fetch as a price or return; bring in exchange or as compensation; make a return of: as, how much did the cargo realizet his labor realizes but little.
  • To convert into real estate; make real property of.
  • To obtain ready money or profits by sale of property.
  • Also spelled realise.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages
  • v. expand or complete (a part in a piece of baroque music) by supplying the harmonies indicated in the figured bass
  • v. be fully aware or cognizant of
  • v. perceive (an idea or situation) mentally
  • v. convert into cash; of goods and property
  • v. make real or concrete; give reality or substance to

Etymologies

French réaliser, from Old French, from real, real; see real1.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Attested since 1610, from French réaliser, from Middle French real ("actual"), from Old French reel, from Latin realis, from res ("thing, event, deed, fact"); as if real +‎ -ize. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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