Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To raise to a more important or responsible job or rank.
  • transitive v. To advance (a student) to the next higher grade.
  • transitive v. To contribute to the progress or growth of; further. See Synonyms at advance.
  • transitive v. To urge the adoption of; advocate: promote a constitutional amendment.
  • transitive v. To attempt to sell or popularize by advertising or publicity: commercials promoting a new product.
  • transitive v. To help establish or organize (a new enterprise), as by securing financial backing: promote a Broadway show.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To raise (someone) to a more important, responsible, or remunerative job or rank.
  • v. To advocate or urge on behalf of (something or someone); to attempt to popularize or sell by means of advertising or publicity.
  • v. To encourage, urge or incite
  • v. To elevate to the above league.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To urge on or incite another, as to strife; also, to inform against a person.
  • transitive v. To contribute to the growth, enlargement, or prosperity of (any process or thing that is in course); to forward; to further; to encourage; to advance; to excite
  • transitive v. To exalt in station, rank, or honor; to elevate; to raise; to prefer; to advance.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To contribute to the establishment, growth, enlargement, or improvement of, as of anything valuable, or to the development, increase, or influence of, as of anything evil; forward; advance.
  • To exalt, or raise to a higher post or position; prefer in rank or honor: as, to promote a captain to a majority.
  • To inform against.
  • Synonyms To further, help, encourage, assist.
  • To give information; be an informer.
  • Promoted.
  • In ecclesiastical law, to appeal to an ecclesiastical court, acting therein as informant and receiving compensation or fines exacted from the defendant. Such an informant is called a promoter and the court is said to be promoted.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. be changed for a superior chess or checker piece
  • v. contribute to the progress or growth of
  • v. give a promotion to or assign to a higher position
  • v. make publicity for; try to sell (a product)
  • v. change a pawn for a better piece by advancing it to the eighth row, or change a checker piece for a more valuable piece by moving it to the row closest to your opponent

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English promoten, from Old French promoter, from Latin prōmovēre, prōmōt- : prō-, forward; see pro-1 + movēre, to move; see meuə- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin prōmōtus, perfect passive participle of prōmoveō ("move forward, advance").

Examples

Comments

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  • In chess, moving a pawn to the 8th rank, allows it to return as a queen, rook, knight, or bishop. Similar to "kinging" in checkers.

    February 21, 2007