Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Highly developed or complex.
  • adjective Being at a higher level than others.
  • adjective Ahead of the times; progressive.
  • adjective Far along in course or time.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Situated in front of or before others.
  • In the front; forward; being in advance of or beyond others in attainments, degree, etc.: as, an advanced Liberal.
  • Having reached a comparatively late stage, as of development, progress, life, etc.: as, he is now at an advanced age.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • adjective In the van or front.
  • adjective In the front or before others, as regards progress or ideas.
  • adjective Far on in life or time.
  • adjective a detachment of troops which precedes the march of the main body.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of advance.
  • adjective At or close to the state of the art.
  • adjective Enhanced.
  • adjective Having moved forward in time or space (e.g. advanced ignition timing).
  • adjective In a late stage of development; greatly developed beyond an initial stage.
  • adjective phonetics Pronounced farther to the front of the vocal tract.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective farther along in physical or mental development
  • adjective far along in time
  • adjective ahead in development; complex or intricate
  • adjective comparatively late in a course of development
  • adjective situated ahead or going before
  • adjective ahead of the times
  • adjective (of societies) highly developed especially in technology or industry
  • adjective at a higher level in training or knowledge or skill

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

advance +‎ -ed

Examples

  • In return, the label advanced money while providing the relationships, expertise and infrastructure to record, manufacture, market, promote, distribute and sell the music.

    Jeff Price: The Democratization of the Music Industry

  • Rebecca's mind, though, of course, there was not much time for her to give to anything but her studies and regular duties now, for as the term advanced the freshmen found their hours pretty well filled.

    Ruth Fielding At College or The Missing Examination Papers

  • As the term advanced the whispers grew and he felt that there were plots in the air.

    Fortitude

  • He was sixteen now and he could when he liked rule them all, and gradually, as the term advanced, he used his strength more and more and was more and more alone.

    Fortitude

  • As the term advanced we had a joint discussion between representative juniors in the two societies.

    The story of my life, or, More than a half century as I have lived it and seen it lived,

  • Meanwhile, as the term advanced, Saint Winifred's gradually revealed itself to Charlie in a more and more unfavourable light.

    St. Winifred's, or The World of School

  • I keep using the term advanced because I have had two different teams take a look and they say it is too difficult for them.

    GetAFreelancer.com - New Projects

  • The trigger is when AOL Time Warner uses the cable assets to deploy what we call advanced instant messaging.

    CNN Transcript Jan 12, 2001

  • Here in Harvard we have had for many years a considerable range of electives in the admission examinations, particularly in what we call the advanced requirements.

    The Making of Arguments

  • According to General Bragg's report, Johnston's line of battle, after marching less than a mile beyond the scene of the first attack made by the three companies of the Twenty-fifth Missouri, came upon the strengthened National pickets, which he calls advanced posts.

    From Fort Henry to Corinth

Comments

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  • His advancement to captain came unexpectedly.

    March 30, 2007