Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Improved by the removal of faults or abuses.
  • adj. Improved in conduct or character.
  • adj. Relating to or being the Protestant churches that follow the teachings of John Calvin and Ulrich Zwingli.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Simple past tense and past participle of reform.
  • adj. Corrected; amended; restored to purity or excellence; said, specifically, of the whole body of Protestant churches originating in the Reformation, or, in a more restricted sense, of those who separated from Martin Luther on the doctrine of consubstantiation, etc., and carried the Reformation, as they claimed, to a higher point.
  • adj. Amended in character and life.
  • adj. Retained in service on half or full pay after the disbandment of the company or troop.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Corrected; amended; restored to purity or excellence; said, specifically, of the whole body of Protestant churches originating in the Reformation. Also, in a more restricted sense, of those who separated from Luther on the doctrine of consubstantiation, etc., and carried the Reformation, as they claimed, to a higher point. The Protestant churches founded by them in Switzerland, France, Holland, and part of Germany, were called the Reformed churches.
  • adj. Amended in character and life.
  • adj. Retained in service on half or full pay after the disbandment of the company or troop; -- said of an officer.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Corrected; amended; restored to a better or to a good state: as, a reformed profligate; reformed spelling.
  • Deprived of rank or position, or reduced in pay. Sec reformado, 2.
  • In the United States:
  • The Reformed (Dutch) Church in America, growing out of a union among the Dutch churches in America in 1770 and finally perfected in 1812. The territory of the denomination was at first limited to the States of New York and New Jersey and a small part of Pennsylvania, but was gradually extended to the West. The affairs of each congregation are managed by a consistory, consisting of elders and deacons chosen for two years. The elders, with the pastor, receive and dismiss members and exercise discipline; the deacons have charge of the alms. Both together are ex officio trustees of the church, hold its property, and call its minister. Ex-elders and ex-deacons constitute what is called the Great Consistory, which may be summoned to give advice in important matters. The minister and one elder from each congregation in a certain district constitute a classis, which supervises spiritual concerns in that district. Four ministers and four elders from each classis in a larger district make a Particular Synod, with similar powers. Representatives, clerical and lay, from each classis, proportioned in number to the size of the classis, constitute the General Synod, which has supervision of the whole, and is a court of last resort in judicial cases. The church is Calvinistic in its theological belief, and possesses a liturgy the greater part of which is optional except the offices for the sacraments, for ordination, and for church discipline.
  • The Reformed (German) Church in the United States. This church was constituted by colonies from Germany in New York, Maryland, Virginia, and North and South Carolina, The first synod was organised September 27th, 1747, under the care of the Reformed Classis of Amsterdam. The church holds to the parity of the ministry, maintains a presbyterial form of government, is moderately Calvinistic in its theology, and provides liturgical forms of service, which are, however, chiefly optional.
  • The True Reformed Dutch Church, the result of a secession from the Reformed Dutch Church in America in 1822.
  • The Reformed Episcopal Church, an Episcopal church organized in the United States in 1873, by eight clergymen and twenty laymen previously members of the Protestant Episcopal Church. It maintains the episcopacy as a desirable form of church polity, but not as of divine obligation, continues to use the Book of Common Prayer, but in a revised form, and rejects the doctrines of apostolic succession, the priesthood of the clergy, the sacrifice or oblation in the Lord's Supper, the real presence, and baptismal regeneration.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. formed again or anew
  • adj. caused to abandon an evil manner of living and follow a good one
  • adj. of or relating to the body of Protestant Christianity arising during the Reformation; used of some Protestant churches especially Calvinist as distinct from Lutheran

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