Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A sudden frenzied rush of panic-stricken animals.
  • n. A sudden headlong rush or flight of a crowd of people.
  • n. A mass impulsive action: a stampede of support for the candidate.
  • transitive v. To cause (a herd of animals) to flee in panic.
  • transitive v. To cause (a crowd of people) to act on mass impulse.
  • intransitive v. To flee in a headlong rush.
  • intransitive v. To act on mass impulse.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A wild, headlong scamper, or running away, of a number of animals; usually caused by fright; hence, any sudden flight or dispersion, as of a crowd or an army in consequence of a panic.
  • n. A situation in which many people in a crowd are trying to go in the same direction at the same time.
  • v. To run away in a panic; said of cattle, horses, etc., also of armies.
  • v. To disperse by causing sudden fright, as a herd or drove of animals.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A wild, headlong scamper, or running away, of a number of animals; usually caused by fright; hence, any sudden flight or dispersion, as of a crowd or an army in consequence of a panic.
  • n. Any sudden unconcerted moving or acting together of a number of persons, as from some common impulse; ; a stampede toward U. S. bonds in the credit markets.
  • intransitive v. To run away in a panic; -- said of droves of cattle, horses, etc., also of armies.
  • transitive v. To disperse by causing sudden fright, as a herd or drove of animals.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A sudden fright seizing upon large bodies of cattle or horses, and causing them to run for long distances; a sudden scattering of a herd of cattle or horses; hence, any sudden flight or general movement, as of an army, in consequence of a panic.
  • n. Any sudden unconcerted movement of a number of persons actuated by a common impulse: as, a stampede in a political convention for a candidate who seems likely to win. Stampedes in American polities have been common since the Democratic convention of 1844.
  • To become generally panic-stricken; take suddenly to flight, as if under the influence of a panic; scamper off in fright: said of herds or droves.
  • To move together, or take the same line of conduct, under the influence of any sudden and common impulse. See stampede, n., 2.
  • To cause to break and run as if panic-stricken; disperse or drive off suddenly through panic or terror.
  • To cause to move or act in a mass through some sudden common impulse: as, to stampede a political convention for a candidate.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cause to run in panic
  • v. act, usually en masse, hurriedly or on an impulse
  • v. cause a group or mass of people to act on an impulse or hurriedly and impulsively
  • n. a wild headlong rush of frightened animals (horses or cattle)
  • n. a headlong rush of people on a common impulse
  • v. run away in a stampede

Etymologies

Spanish estampida, uproar, stampede, from Provençal, from estampir, to stamp, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Spanish estampida (in America) a stampede, estampido a crackling, akin to estampar to stamp, of German origin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Northland Scripture, the stampede is to the swift, the blazing of stakes to the strong, and the Crown in royalties, gathers to itself the fulness thereof.

    Too Much Gold

  • The ethanol stampede is contributing to a sugar shortage.

    Jack Bog's Blog: August 2009 Archives

  • As the cattle continued their short-term stampede, campus cops intervened and inexplicably held Kotran against his will.

    Dan Reimold: College Media Censorship: Year in Review

  • And the cure for the panic stampede is to be found in historical perspective.

    February « 2007 « Innovation Cloud

  • That is one of the reasons that the revolutionary movement occurred -- the reason of a stampede from the front -- and it is quite possible that the Germans have been shrewd enough to realize that it was quite well to give time for that to happen, for some disintegrating force to take place.

    Russia

  • Northland Scripture, the stampede is to the swift, the blazing of stakes to the strong, and the Crown, in royalties, gathers to itself the fulness thereof.

    Too Much Gold

  • People mourn victims in German stampede Chinese consulate-general confirms one female citizen killed in German stampede Death toll of German stampede rises to 19, over 300 injured The stampede took place shortly after 5 pm Saturday as people were jostling with each other in an entrance tunnel to a former freight rail station in the western German city of Duisburg, where the event was being held.

    WN.com - Articles related to Germany plans memorial for music festival victims

  • As for the Christmas shopping … or should I call it stampede … I have gotten to where I can’t take it.

    The Season of Discontent

  • Appearing in the stampede was a dog modeled on Winter, the real and slightly overweight pet sprawled on the conference-room floor next to Mr. Milk.

    Beyond 'Thriller': Reinventing The Music Video

  • A young woman died and 10 people were injured in what one witness described as a stampede at a nightclub.

    Student killed in nightclub 'stampede'

Comments

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  • A crush of many-legged philatelists.

    December 5, 2007