Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To force or drive forward or onward; impel.
  • transitive v. To entreat earnestly and often repeatedly; exhort.
  • transitive v. To advocate earnestly the doing, consideration, or approval of; press for: urge passage of the bill; a speech urging moderation.
  • transitive v. To stimulate; excite: "It urged him to an intensity like madness” ( D.H. Lawrence).
  • transitive v. To move or impel to action, effort, or speed; spur.
  • intransitive v. To exert an impelling force; push vigorously.
  • intransitive v. To present a forceful argument, claim, or case.
  • n. The act of urging.
  • n. An impulse that prompts action or effort: suppressed an urge to laugh.
  • n. An involuntary tendency to perform a given activity; an instinct: "There is a human urge to clarify, rationalize, justify” ( Leonard Bernstein).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A strong desire; an itch to do something.
  • v. To press; to push; to drive; to impel; to force onward.
  • v. To press the mind or will of; to ply with motives, arguments, persuasion, or importunity.
  • v. To provoke; to exasperate.
  • v. To present in an urgent manner; to insist upon.
  • v. (obsolete): To treat with forcible means; to take severe or violent measures with; as, to urge an ore with intense heat.
  • v. To press onward or forward.
  • v. To be pressing in argument; to insist; to persist.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To press; to push; to drive; to impel; to force onward.
  • transitive v. To press the mind or will of; to ply with motives, arguments, persuasion, or importunity.
  • transitive v. To provoke; to exasperate.
  • transitive v. To press hard upon; to follow closely.
  • transitive v. To present in an urgent manner; to press upon attention; to insist upon
  • transitive v. To treat with forcible means; to take severe or violent measures with.
  • intransitive v. To press onward or forward.
  • intransitive v. To be pressing in argument; to insist; to persist.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To press; impel; force onward.
  • To hasten laboriously; quicken with effort.
  • To press the mind or will of; serve as a motive or impelling cause; impel; constrain; spur.
  • To press or ply hard with arguments, entreaties, or the like; request with earnestness; importune; solicit earnestly.
  • To press upon attention; present in an earnest manner; press by way of argument or in opposition; insist on; allege in extenuation, justification, or defense: as, to urge an argument; to urge the necessity of a case.
  • To ply hard in a contest or an argument; attack briskly.
  • To provoke; incite; exasperate.
  • To press on or forward.
  • To incite; stimulate; impel.
  • To make a claim; insist; persist.
  • To produce arguments or proofs; make allegations; declare.
  • n. The act of urging; impulse.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a strong restless desire
  • v. spur on or encourage especially by cheers and shouts
  • v. force or impel in an indicated direction
  • v. push for something
  • n. an instinctive motive

Etymologies

Latin urgēre.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin urgeō ("I urge"). This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • When writing formal written texts, polite language is used to encourage someone to do something.

    I urge you to consider...
    I urge you to reconsider...
    I want to encourage you to...
    Wouldn’t you prefer to...?
    Would you consider…?

    October 22, 2012