Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To direct (a person) to do something; order or urge.
  • transitive verb To require or impose (an action or behavior, for example) with authority and emphasis; prescribe.
  • transitive verb To prohibit or forbid.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To join; unite.
  • To lay upon, as an order or command; put an injunction upon; order or direct with urgency; admonish or instruct with authority; command.
  • In law, to prohibit or restrain by a judicial order called an injunction: used absolutely of a thing, or with from of a person: as, the court enjoined the prosecution of the work; the defendant was enjoined from proceeding.
  • To lay as an injunction; enforce by way of order or command: as, I enjoin it on you not to disappoint me; he enjoined upon them the strictest obedience.
  • Synonyms Enjoin, Direct, Command; to bid, require, urge, impress upon. Johnson says enjoin is more authoritative than direct and less imperious than command. It has the force of pressing admonition with authority; as, a parent enjoins on his children the duty of obedience. But it has also the sense of command: as, the duties enjoined by God in the moral law.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To lay upon, as an order or command; to give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order; to charge.
  • transitive verb (Law) To prohibit or restrain by a judicial order or decree; to put an injunction on.
  • transitive verb obsolete To join or unite.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive To lay upon, as an order or command; to give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order; to charge.
  • verb transitive, law To prohibit or restrain by a judicial order or decree; to put an injunction on.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb give instructions to or direct somebody to do something with authority
  • verb issue an injunction

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English enjoinen, from Old French enjoindre, from Latin iniungere : in-, causative pref.; see en– + iungere, to join; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French enjoindre ("to join with"), from Latin injungere ("to attach"), a compound of in- ("into” “upon") and jungere.

Examples

Comments

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  • Direct or impose v. prohibit or forbid.

    May 24, 2008