Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To apply force to (something) so as to cause or tend to cause motion toward the source of the force.
  • intransitive verb To remove from a fixed position; extract.
  • intransitive verb To tug at; jerk or tweak.
  • intransitive verb To rip or tear; rend.
  • intransitive verb To stretch (taffy, for example) repeatedly.
  • intransitive verb To strain (a muscle, for example) injuriously.
  • intransitive verb Informal To attract; draw.
  • intransitive verb Slang To draw out (a weapon) in readiness for use.
  • intransitive verb Informal To remove.
  • intransitive verb Sports To hit (a ball) so that it moves in the direction away from the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the left of a right-handed player.
  • intransitive verb To operate (an oar) in rowing.
  • intransitive verb To transport or propel by rowing.
  • intransitive verb To be rowed by.
  • intransitive verb To rein in (a horse) to keep it from winning a race.
  • intransitive verb Printing To produce (a print or an impression) from type.
  • intransitive verb To exert force in moving something toward the source of the force.
  • intransitive verb To move in a certain direction or toward a certain goal.
  • intransitive verb To gain a position closer to an objective.
  • intransitive verb To drink or inhale deeply.
  • intransitive verb Nautical To row a boat.
  • intransitive verb Informal To express or feel great sympathy or empathy.
  • noun The act or process of pulling.
  • noun Force exerted in pulling or required to overcome resistance in pulling.
  • noun A sustained effort.
  • noun Something, such as a knob on a drawer, that is used for pulling.
  • noun A deep inhalation or draft, as on a cigarette or of a beverage.
  • noun Slang A means of gaining special advantage; influence.
  • noun Informal The ability to draw or attract; appeal.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English pullen, from Old English pullian.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English pullen, from Old English pullian ("to pull, draw, tug, pluck off"). Related to Middle Dutch pullen ("to drink"), Low German pulen ("to pick, pluck, pull, tear, strip off husks"), Icelandic púla ("to work hard, beat").

Examples

Comments

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  • From McSweeney's.net:

    AN OPEN LETTER TO EVERYONE WHO, WHEN APPROACHING THE DOOR TO THE OFFICE SUITE WHERE I AM THE RECEPTIONIST, TURNS THE HANDLE DOWN, THEN PUSHES THE DOOR IN, THEREBY CAUSING A LOUD OBNOXIOUS BANGING SOUND, LOOKS UP AT ME WITH FEAR AND FRUSTRATION IN THEIR EYES, TURNS THE HANDLE UP THIS TIME, BUT STILL PUSHES THE DOOR IN, CAUSING THAT SAME OBNOXIOUS BANGING SOUND, GIVING ME THE SAME TERRIFIED LOOK, THEN RINGS THE DOORBELL, WHICH IS EVEN LOUDER AND MORE PIERCING, THEN STANDS THERE, PETRIFIED, ANGRY AT MY INCOMPETENCE TO UNLOCK THE DOOR WITH THE REMOTE-CONTROL DEVICE.

    March 22, 2005

    To you people,

    Pull.

    PULL the door open. Turn the handle any old way you want. But then PULL. Don't push. Stop pushing the door. Pull. Pull it. The door will open if you pull it. I can't stand that banging sound. No, it's not locked. It's unlocked. I unlocked it. Yes, I see you there. And I unlocked it. It works. The battery is not dead. I checked. I'm not playing a trick on you. Stop looking at me like that. And stop ringing the doorbell. Just pull. Pull the door.

    Pull.

    Pull.

    Pull.

    Pull,

    Kurt Chiang

    September 26, 2008