Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Of changeable or variegated color; iridescent.
  • adjective Streaked or flecked with or as if with yarn of a different color.
  • adjective Interspersed or permeated with a distinctive quality.
  • adjective Worn-out; ruined.
  • adjective Exhausted; thoroughly tired.
  • noun The firing or discharge of a weapon, such as a gun.
  • noun The distance over which something is shot; the range.
  • noun An attempt to hit a target with a projectile.
  • noun An attempt to reach a target with a rocket.
  • noun An attempt to score into a goal, as in soccer or hockey.
  • noun The flight or path of a projectile in a game.
  • noun A sharply hit or driven ball or puck.
  • noun A stroke in a game, as in golf or billiards.
  • noun A pointed or critical remark.
  • noun An attempt; a try.
  • noun An opportunity.
  • noun A chance at odds; something to bet on.
  • noun A solid projectile designed to be discharged from a firearm or cannon.
  • noun Such projectiles, especially when fired in clusters, considered as a group.
  • noun Tiny lead or steel pellets, especially ones used in a shotgun cartridge.
  • noun One of these pellets.
  • noun Sports The heavy metal ball that is put for distance in the shot put.
  • noun One who shoots in a particular way.
  • noun A charge of explosives used in blasting mine shafts.
  • noun A detonation of an explosive charge.
  • noun A photograph taken of a particular subject.
  • noun A single continuous recording made with a movie camera.
  • noun A hypodermic injection.
  • noun A small amount given or applied at one time.
  • noun A drink, especially a jigger of liquor.
  • noun An amount to be paid, as for drinks; a bill.
  • noun Nautical A length of chain equal to 15 fathoms (90 feet) in the United States and 12.5 fathoms (75 feet) in Great Britain.
  • transitive verb To load or weight with shot.
  • idiom (like a shot) Very quickly.
  • idiom (shot in the arm) Something that boosts one's spirits.
  • idiom (shot in the dark) A guess.
  • idiom (shot in the dark) An attempt that has little chance of succeeding.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The trout, Salmo fario.
  • noun The grayling, Thymallus vulgaris. Also shut, shutt.
  • Preterit and past participle of shoot.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English sceot, scot; see skeud- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old English scēot, from Germanic *skot-. Cognate with German Schoß. Compare scot.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.