Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A narrow opening; a groove or slit.
  • noun A gap between a main and auxiliary airfoil to provide space for airflow and facilitate the smooth passage of air over the wing.
  • noun An assigned place in a sequence or schedule.
  • noun A position of employment in an organization or hierarchy.
  • noun Computers An expansion slot.
  • noun Informal A slot machine designed for gambling.
  • noun Football A space or gap between an end and a tackle in an offensive line.
  • noun Sports An unmarked area in front of the goal between the face-off circles on an ice hockey rink.
  • transitive verb To cut or make a slot or slots in.
  • transitive verb To put into or assign to a slot.
  • noun The track or trail of a deer.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The fastening of a door; a bar; a bolt.
  • noun A piece of timber which connects or holds together larger pieces; a slat.
  • noun A small piece.
  • noun A castle; a fort.
  • noun A hollow.
  • noun In machinery, an elongated narrow depression or perforation; a rectangular recess or depression cut partially into the thickness of any piece, for the reception of another piece of similar form, as a key-seat in the eye of a wheel or pulley; an oblong hole or aperture formed throughout the entire thickness of a piece of metal, as for the reception of an adjusting-bolt. See cut under sheep-shears.
  • noun In a cable street-railroad, a narrow continuous opening between the rails, through which the grip on the car passes to connect with the traveling cable.
  • noun A trapdoor in the stage of a theater.
  • noun A hollow tuck in a cap, or other part of the dress.
  • noun A hem or casing prepared for receiving a string, as at the mouth of a bag.
  • To slit; cut; gash.
  • To provide with a slot or groove; hollow out.
  • In coal-mining, same as hole, 3 .
  • noun The track of a deer, as followed by the scent or by the mark of the foot; any such track, trace, or trail.
  • To track by the slot, as deer. Compare slothound.
  • To shut with violence; slam.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A broad, flat, wooden bar; a slat or sloat.
  • noun Prov. Eng. A bolt or bar for fastening a door.
  • noun A narrow depression, perforation, or aperture; esp., one for the reception of a piece fitting or sliding in it.
  • noun The track of a deer; hence, a track of any kind.
  • transitive verb Obs. or Prov. Eng. To shut with violence; to slam.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun The track of an animal, especially a deer.
  • noun A broad, flat, wooden bar, a slat, especially as used to secure a door, window, etc.
  • noun A metal bolt or wooden bar, especially as a crosspiece.
  • noun electrical A channel opening in the stator or rotor of a rotating machine for ventilation and insertion of windings.
  • noun slang, surfing surfing term for the barrel or tube of a wave.
  • verb obsolete To bolt or lock a door or window.
  • noun A narrow depression, perforation, or aperture; especially, one for the reception of a piece fitting or sliding in it.
  • noun A gap in a schedule or sequence.
  • noun aviation The allocated time for an aircraft's departure or arrival at an airport's runway.
  • noun aviation In a flying display, the fourth position; after the leader and two wingmen.
  • noun computing A space in memory or on disk etc. in which a particular type of object can be stored.
  • noun informal A slot machine designed for gambling.
  • noun slang The vagina.
  • verb To put something (such as a coin) into a slot (narrow aperture)
  • verb To assign something or someone into a slot (gap in a schedule or sequence)
  • verb To put something where it belongs.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Obsolete French esclot, horse's hoofprint, from Old French, perhaps from Old Norse slōdh, track.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, hollow of the breastbone, from Old French esclot.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French esclot, from Old Norse slóð ("track"). Compare sleuth.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle Low German slot or Middle Dutch slot, from West Germanic. Cognate with German Schloss ("door-bolt").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Old French esclot, of unknown origin.

Examples

Comments

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  • Okay, thanks to WeirdNet I'm learning something new. But could someone possibly tell me what the definition means?

    August 7, 2008

  • 'Tell me what the definition means' contains, for example, an indirect object slot:

    Tell you what the definition means.

    Tell the starving orphan what the definition means.

    It contains a couple of verb slots:

    Teach me what the definition means.

    Tell me what the definition represents.

    A tense slot on the second verb:

    Tell me what the definition meant.

    August 7, 2008

  • .... wow ....

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    August 7, 2008

  • You realize, of course, that this is completely destroying the Mystery of WeirdNet. ;-)

    August 7, 2008

  • The Mystery of WeirdNet is an infinite and inexhausible resource, a thing illimitably unfathomable and therefore, like the Library of Babel, beyond true destruction.

    Thanks for the explanation, qroqqa.

    August 8, 2008

  • Wellll . . . Yes, I guess you're right. There's just no end to the delightful nonsense that is WeirdNet. I'm glad John never fixed it. ;->

    August 8, 2008

  • Another definition: The traditional position of the main editor of a newspaper, who sat behind a large horseshoe-shaped desk (or desks arranged like a horseshoe) facing his assistant editors.

    Example: "Because of the horseshoe shape, the chief is surrounded on three sides by desks and is said to be "in the slot" and his helpers "on the rim." The slot man is the news editor....

    -- Neal, R.M. News Gathering and News Writing. New York: Prentice-Hall, 1949.

    July 12, 2009