Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To shut with force and loud noise: slammed the door.
  • transitive v. To put, throw, or otherwise forcefully move so as to produce a loud noise: slammed the book on the desk.
  • transitive v. To hit or strike with great force.
  • transitive v. Slang To criticize harshly; censure forcefully.
  • intransitive v. To close or swing into place with force so as to produce a loud noise.
  • intransitive v. To hit something with force; crash: slammed into a truck.
  • n. A forceful impact that makes a loud noise.
  • n. A noise so produced.
  • n. An act of shutting forcefully and loudly: the slam of a door.
  • n. Slang A harsh or devastating criticism.
  • n. A poetry slam.
  • n. The winning of all the tricks or all but one during the play of one hand in bridge and other whist-derived card games.
  • n. A contract to make a slam.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To shut with sudden force so as to produce a shock and noise.
  • v. To put in or on a particular place with force and loud noise. (Often followed by a preposition such as down, against or into.)
  • v. To strike forcefully with some implement.
  • v. To speak badly of.
  • v. To dunk forcefully, to slam dunk.
  • v. To make a slam bid.
  • v. to change providers (e.g. of domain registration or telephone carrier) for a customer without clear (if any) consent.
  • v. to drink off, to drink quickly
  • n. A sudden impact or blow.
  • n. The shock and noise produced by violently closing a door or other object.
  • n. (basketball) A slam dunk.
  • n. An insult.
  • n. The yellow iron silicate produced in alum works as a waste product.
  • n. A poetry slam.
  • n. The refuse of alum works.
  • n. A type of card game, also called ruff and honours.
  • n. Losing or winning all the tricks in a game.
  • n. A bid of six (small slam) or seven (grand slam) in a suit or no trump.
  • v. To defeat by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To shut with force and a loud noise; to bang.
  • transitive v. To put in or on some place with force and loud noise; -- usually with down.
  • transitive v. To strike with some implement with force; hence, to beat or cuff.
  • transitive v. To strike down; to slaughter.
  • transitive v. To defeat (opponents at cards) by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.
  • intransitive v. To come or swing against something, or to shut, with sudden force so as to produce a shock and noise.
  • n. The act of one who, or that which, slams.
  • n. The shock and noise produced in slamming.
  • n. Winning all the tricks of a deal (called, in bridge, grand slam, the winning of all but one of the thirteen tricks being called a little slam or small slam).
  • n. The refuse of alum works.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To close with force and noise; shut with violence; bang.
  • To push violently or rudely; beat; cuff.
  • To throw violently and with a loud, sudden noise: as, to slam a book down upon the table.
  • In card-playing, to beat by winning all the tricks in a hand or game.
  • To move or close violently and with noise; strike violently and noisily against something.
  • n. A violent and noisy collision or bang, as when a door is suddenly shut by the wind, or by a vehement push: as, the shutters were closed with a slam.
  • n. The winning of all the tricks in a hand at whist, or in a game of euchre.
  • n. The refuse of alumworks.
  • n. An old game at cards.
  • n. An ill-shaped, shambling fellow.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. winning all or all but one of the tricks in bridge
  • v. close violently
  • n. the noise made by the forceful impact of two objects
  • n. a forceful impact that makes a loud noise
  • n. an aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect
  • v. dance the slam dance
  • v. strike violently
  • v. throw violently

Etymologies

Perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse slambra, to strike at.
Origin unknown.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Apparently from a Scandinavian source; compare Norwegian slamre, Swedish slemma. (Wiktionary)
Origin unknown. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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