Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A metric unit of mass equal to one thousandth (10-3) of a kilogram. See Table at measurement.
  • n. Any of several plants, such as the chickpea, bearing seeds widely used as food in tropical Asia.
  • n. The seeds of such a plant.
  • n. Informal A grandmother.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A unit of mass equal to one-thousandth of a kilogram. Symbol: g
  • n. A group of leguminous plants that are grown for their seeds.
  • n. The seeds of these plants.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Angry.
  • n. The East Indian name of the chick-pea (Cicer arietinum) and its seeds; also, other similar seeds there used for food.
  • n. The unit of weight in the metric system. It was intended to be exactly, and is very nearly, equivalent to the weight in a vacuum of one cubic centimeter of pure water at its maximum density. It is equal to 15.432 grains. See grain, n., 4.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Angry; fierce.
  • To vex; make angry or sorry.
  • To grieve; be sorry.
  • In the East Indies, the chick-pea, Cicer arietinum, there used extensively as fodder for horses and cattle, and also in cakes, curries, etc.
  • An abbreviation of grammar.
  • A terminal element in nouns of Greek origin, denoting ‘that which is written or marked,’ as in diagram, epigram, program, monogram, telegram, etc.
  • n. Anger; scorn; bitterness; repugnance.
  • n.
  • n. In the metric system, a unit of mass.
  • n. In kinematics, the curve described by a point of a link-motion.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a metric unit of weight equal to one thousandth of a kilogram
  • n. Danish physician and bacteriologist who developed a method of staining bacteria to distinguish among them (1853-1938)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

French gramme, from Late Latin gramma, a small weight, from Greek, something written, small weight; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots.
Obsolete Portuguese, from Latin grānum, seed; see gr̥ə-no- in Indo-European roots.
Shortening and alteration of gramma1 or grandmother.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From French gramme, from Ancient Greek γραμμάριον (grammárion, "weight of two obols"), from γραμμή (grammḗ, "line").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

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