Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To reject with disdain or derision.
  • intransitive verb To spy on or explore carefully in order to obtain information; reconnoiter.
  • intransitive verb To observe and evaluate (a talented person), as for possible hiring.
  • intransitive verb To search as a scout.
  • intransitive verb To search for talented people.
  • noun One that is dispatched from a main body to gather information, especially in preparation for military action.
  • noun The act of reconnoitering.
  • noun A watcher or sentinel.
  • noun One who is employed to discover and recruit talented persons, especially in the fields of sports and entertainment.
  • noun Sports One who is employed to observe and report on the strategies and players of rival teams.
  • noun A member of the Boy Scouts.
  • noun A member of the Girl Scouts.
  • noun Informal An individual; a person.
  • noun Chiefly British A student's male servant at Oxford University.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To observe or explore as a scout; watch the movements of an enemy.
  • To watch closely; observe the actions of; spy out.
  • To range over for the purpose of discovery.
  • noun A swift Dutch sailing boat.
  • noun A person sent out to gain and bring in information; specifically, one employed to observe the motions and obtain intelligence of the numbers of an enemy.
  • noun A scouting party.
  • noun A spy; a sneak.
  • noun A college servant or waiter.
  • noun In cricket, a fielder.
  • noun The act of looking out or watching; lookout; watch.
  • noun One of various birds of the auk family (Alcidæ) which are common on the British islands, as the razor-billed auk, the common or foolish guillemot, and the puffin or sea-parrot.
  • noun In the Netherlands, a bailiff or magistrate. See schout.
  • noun Naval, a vessel employed in obtaining information concerning the positions and numbers of the enemy's fleet. See also scout cruiser.
  • noun A high rock.
  • To ridicule; sneer at; treat with disdain. and contempt; reject with scorn: as, to scout a proposal.
  • To pour forth a liquid forcibly; eject liquid excrement.
  • noun The guillemot.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To observe, watch, or look for, as a scout; to follow for the purpose of observation, as a scout.
  • transitive verb To pass over or through, as a scout; to reconnoiter.
  • noun A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information of the movements and condition of an enemy.
  • noun Cant A college student's or undergraduate's servant; -- so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip.
  • noun (Cricket) A fielder in a game for practice.
  • noun colloq. The act of scouting or reconnoitering.
  • noun A boy scout or girl scout (which see, above).
  • noun Prov. Eng. A projecting rock.
  • transitive verb To reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout.
  • intransitive verb To go on the business of scouting, or watching the motions of an enemy; to act as a scout.
  • noun obsolete A swift sailing boat.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb transitive To reject with contempt.
  • verb intransitive To scoff.
  • noun dated A swift sailing boat.
  • noun A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information about the enemy and ground.
  • noun An act of scouting or reconnoitering.
  • noun A member of any number of youth organizations belonging to the international scout movement, such as the Boy Scouts of America or Girl Scouts of the United States.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Of Scandinavian origin; see skeud- in Indo-European roots.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From Middle English scoute, act of watching or spying, from Old French escoute, from escouter, to listen, alteration of ascouter, from Vulgar Latin *ascultāre, alteration of Latin auscultāre; see ous- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Of Scandinavian origin: compare Old Norse skūti, skūta = "taunt"; thus may be related to "shout".

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old French escouter ("to listen, heed"), from Latin auscultare ("to listen").

Examples

Comments

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  • Tonto. See A Horse is a Horse

    February 1, 2008

  • Is a scout a 'shooter of words' in the metaphorest? (see entry from IE roots below)

    skeud-
    To shoot, chase, throw.
    Derivatives include shoot, shut, and scuttle.1

    shoot, from Old English scēotan, to shoot, from Germanic *skeutan, to shoot.
    shot1, from Old English sceot, scot, shooting, a shot;
    schuss, from Old High German scuz, shooting, a shot;
    scot, scot and lot, from Old Norse skot and Old French escot, contribution, tax (< "money thrown down");
    wainscot, from Middle Dutch sc(h)ot, crossbar, wooden partition. a-d all from Germanic *skutaz, shooting, shot.
    shut, from Old English scyttan, to shut (by pushing a crossbar), probably from Germanic *skutjan.
    shuttle, from Old English scytel, a dart, missile, from Germanic *skutilaz.
    sheet2, from Old English scēata, corner of a sail;
    sheet1, from Old English scēte, piece of cloth. Both a and b from Germanic *skautjōn‑.
    scout2, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse skūta, mockery (< "shooting of words");
    shout, from Old Norse skūta, a taunt. Both a and b from Germanic *skut‑.

    Pokorny 2. (s)keud‑ 955.

    - <i>American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots</i>

    February 29, 2016