Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To regard or treat with haughty contempt; despise. See Synonyms at despise.
  • transitive v. To consider or reject as beneath oneself.
  • n. A feeling or show of contempt and aloofness; scorn.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A feeling of contempt or scorn.
  • v. To regard (someone or something) with strong contempt.
  • v. To be indignant or offended.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A feeling of contempt and aversion; the regarding anything as unworthy of or beneath one; scorn.
  • n. That which is worthy to be disdained or regarded with contempt and aversion.
  • n. The state of being despised; shame.
  • transitive v. To think unworthy; to deem unsuitable or unbecoming.
  • transitive v. To reject as unworthy of one's self, or as not deserving one's notice; to look with scorn upon; to scorn, as base acts, character, etc.
  • intransitive v. To be filled with scorn; to feel contemptuous anger; to be haughty.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To think unworthy or worthless; reject as unworthy of notice or of one's own character; look upon with contempt and aversion; contemn; despise: as, to disdain a mean action.
  • To fill with scorn or contempt.
  • Synonyms Despise, etc. (See scorn), scout, spurn. See comparison of nouns under arrogance.
  • To be filled with scorn or contempt.
  • n. A feeling of contempt mingled with aversion; contempt; scorn.
  • n. The state of being despised; the state of feeling one′ s self disgraced; ignominy; disgrace.
  • n. That which is worthy of disdain.
  • n. Synonyms pride, Presumption, etc. (see arrogance), scornfulness, contemptuousness.See scorn, v.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient
  • v. reject with contempt
  • n. lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike
  • v. look down on with disdain

Etymologies

Middle English disdeinen, from Old French desdeignier, from Vulgar Latin *disdignāre, from Latin dēdignārī : dē-, de- + dignārī, to deem worthy (from dignus, worthy; see dek- in Indo-European roots).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French desdeignier (modern French dédaigner). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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