Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Having a feeling of opposition, distaste, or aversion; strongly disinclined.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To turn away; avert. B. Jonson.
  • Turned away from anything; turned backward; averted.
  • Hence Specifically: In botany, turned away from the central axis: opposed to adverse (which see). In ornithology, set back or turned away from: applied to pygopodous or rumpfooted birds, whose legs are set so far back that the erect posture is necessitated, as in the case of the loon, grebe, or auk.
  • Disliking; unwilling; having reluctance.
  • Unfavorable; indisposed; adverse.
  • [This word and its derivatives are now regularly followed by to, and not by from, although the latter is used by some modern writers. The word itself includes the idea of from; but the literal meaning is ignored, the affection of the mind signified by the word being regarded as exerted toward the object of dislike. Similarly, the kindred terms contrary, repugnant, etc., are also followed by to.] Synonyms Averse, Reluctant, disinclined, backward, slow, loath, opposed. Averse implies habitual dislike or unwillingness, though not of a very strong character, and is nearly synonymous with disinclined: as, averse to study, to active pursuits. Reluctant, literally, struggling back from, implies some degree of struggle either with others who are inciting us on, or between our own inclination and some strong motive, as sense of duty, whether it operates as an impelling or as a restraining influence. See antipathy.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • verb obsolete To turn away.
  • adjective obsolete Turned away or backward.
  • adjective Having a repugnance or opposition of mind; disliking; disinclined; unwilling; reluctant.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective Having a repugnance or opposition of mind.
  • adjective Turned away or backward.
  • adjective obsolete Lying on the opposite side (to or from).
  • verb transitive To turn away.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Latin āversus, past participle of āvertere, to turn away; see avert.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin aversus, past participle of avertere ("to avert")

Examples

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