Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To practice (a part in a play or a piece of music, for example) in preparation for a public performance. synonym: practice.
  • intransitive verb To practice (an action) by repetition so as to improve performance.
  • intransitive verb To direct in a rehearsal.
  • intransitive verb To repeat or recite.
  • intransitive verb To list or enumerate.
  • intransitive verb To practice something, such as a speech, before presenting it publicly.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To repeat, as what has already been said or written; recite; say or deliver again.
  • To mention; narrate; relate; recount; recapitulate; enumerate.
  • To repeat, act, or perform in private for experiment and practice, preparatory to a public performance: as, to rehearse a tragedy; to rehearse a symphony.
  • To cause to recite or narrate; put through a rehearsal; prompt.
  • Synonyms To detail, describe. See recapitulate.
  • To repeat what has been already said, written, or performed; go through some performance in private, preparatory to public representation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To recite or repeat something for practice.
  • transitive verb To repeat, as what has been already said; to tell over again; to recite.
  • transitive verb To narrate; to relate; to tell.
  • transitive verb To recite or repeat in private for experiment and improvement, before a public representation.
  • transitive verb rare To cause to rehearse; to instruct by rehearsal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To repeat, as what has been already said; to tell over again; to recite.
  • verb To narrate; to relate; to tell.
  • verb To practice by recitation or repetition in private for experiment and improvement, prior to a public representation; as, to rehearse a tragedy.
  • verb To cause to rehearse; to instruct by rehearsal.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb engage in a rehearsal (of)

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English rehercen, to repeat, from Old French rehercier : re-, re- + hercier, to harrow (from herce, harrow; see hearse).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English rehersen, from Anglo-Norman reherser.

Examples

  • That would suggest she needs time to 'rehearse' her policies or beliefs?

    Plouffe: Palin would be 'catastrophic' as 2012 GOP nominee

  • She's a hot gangly mess, twirling pompons and posing for Tareq before she heads off to "rehearse" for her half-time "performance" with the Washington Redskins alumni cheerleaders.

    Housewives Nightlife Ep. 7: Pompon and Circumstance

  • They were so shy, and yet eager to know and "rehearse" what to do if they were in trouble.

    Ellen Snortland: Roman Polanski, Have I Got a Sentence for You!

  • The article focuses on imagery-rehearsal therapy, a technique where nightmare sufferers imagine how they would re-script a frightening dream, then "rehearse" it several times during the day and just before going to sleep at night.

    Anne Hill: Why We Dream And How To Rewrite Nightmares

  • They also have their own personal private trailers to retreat to together to "rehearse" and they stay in luxurious suites at hotels with their own security teams to keep them safe from prying eyes.

    Bonnie Fuller: Battle of the Cheaters! Who Does It More: Hollywooders or Politicos?

  • And I must say, while I'm happy to be clearly "on the mend," I was grateful to be able to "rehearse" at least some of the catalogue!

    Mental Rehearsal

  • For the record, the band didnae '"rehearse" during their day off after San Diego, so this is still pretty damn fresh ...

    The Fall online - latest Fall News

  • Me and my friend had deliberately goaded the bespectacled trumpet-wielder a few days before by pretending to "rehearse" 'Brown Sugar' ourselves in one of the school music rooms, knowing our rival was next door and was sure to come bursting in waving his arms around like a girl.

    Archive 2005-11-01

  • Me and my friend had deliberately goaded the bespectacled trumpet-wielder a few days before by pretending to "rehearse" 'Brown Sugar' ourselves in one of the school music rooms, knowing our rival was next door and was sure to come bursting in waving his arms around like a girl.

    Cover story

  • Although the hotel did kind of rehearse the fire too, as they used smoke in the corridors, in case the smoke needed to learn where to go, I guess.

    We all know about technology

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