Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The quality or condition of being impertinent, especially:
  • n. Insolence.
  • n. Irrelevance.
  • n. An impertinent act or statement.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Lack of pertinence; irrelevance.
  • n. An instance of this; a moment of being impertinent.
  • n. The fact or character of being out of place; inappropriateness.
  • n. insolence.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The condition or quality of being impertinent; absence of pertinence, or of adaptedness; irrelevance; unfitness.
  • n. Conduct or language unbecoming the person, the society, or the circumstances; rudeness; incivility.
  • n. That which is impertinent; a thing out of place, or of no value.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To treat with impertinence, rudeness, or incivility; affect as with impertinence.
  • n. The condition or quality of being impertinent or irrelevant; the condition of not being appropriate to the matter in hand; irrelevance.
  • n. That which is impertinent; that which is irrelevant or out of place, as in speech, writing, or manners.
  • n. Conduct unbecoming the person, society, circumstances, etc.; incivility; presumption; forwardness.
  • n. In law, matter (especially in a pleading or an affidavit) which is immaterial in substance, and from prolixity or extent is so inconvenient as to render its presence objectionable.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an impudent statement
  • n. the trait of being rude and impertinent; inclined to take liberties
  • n. inappropriate playfulness

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

French impertinence

Examples

  • And then with more apologies for what he called his impertinence, he took his leave, and I felt altogether very much pleased and flattered.

    Uncle Silas

  • “Much impertinence is hydroscopic,” said the speaker on the translator console.

    365 tomorrows » Translator : A New Free Flash Fiction SciFi Story Every Day

  • You think the thing said ‘Much impertinence is hydroscopic’?

    365 tomorrows » Translator : A New Free Flash Fiction SciFi Story Every Day

  • 'I never thought well of her, pretending to drink nothing but water; and with that short, dry way, that I call impertinence; but I never thought she could be so lost till last night!

    Hopes and Fears or, scenes from the life of a spinster

  • He expressed in strong terms his annoyance at what he called their impertinence, whilst I could not but laugh at his impatience, as well as at the mortification of the unfortunate pedestrians, whose eagerness to see him, I said, was, in my opinion, highly flattering to him.

    Life of Lord Byron, Vol. 4 (of 6) With His Letters and Journals

  • Very soon after, this anxiety was tinctured with a feeling more severe; he saw her spoken to negligently by Sir Sedley – he required, after what he had already himself deemed impertinence from the Baronet, that she should have assumed to him a distant dignity; but he perceived, on the contrary, that she answered him with pleasant alacrity, and, when not engaged by Mrs. Berlinton, attended to him, even with distinction.

    Camilla: or, A Picture of Youth

  • All the Branghtons called to take leave of me; but I will not write a word more about them: indeed I cannot, with any patience, think of that family, to whose forwardness and impertinence is owing all the uneasiness I at this moment suffer!

    Evelina: or, The History of a Young Lady's Entrance Into the World

  • "I call it impertinence," the lady went on, "and very well-grown impertinence too – from a child like that!

    Melbourne House

  • If someone insults me and I become angry, his impertinence will be the aspect of his behavior that fits the formal object of anger: I only become angry once I construe the person's remark as a slight; the specific nature of my emotion's formal object is a function of my appraisal of the situation.

    Emotion

  • A bold, swelling, arrogant effrontery -- a sort of stark, staring, self-complacent, comfortable, and yet innocent impertinence, which is at once irritating and amusing, aggravating and attractive, and which is exhibited in the greatest intensity in the whisky-john.

    The Young Fur Traders

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