Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Same as sauer-kraut.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun See sourkrout.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic sauerkraut

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

German Kraut

Examples

  • CHILD: And think a crout (ph) of tomato in one ...

    CNN Transcript Aug 21, 2004

  • CHILD: And think a crout (ph) of tomato in one ...

    CNN Transcript Aug 15, 2002

  • But the trouble with sour crout is that sailors loathe it and have to be flogged to eat it.

    Morgan’s Run

  • There is a pickled cabbage called ‘sour crout’ my cousin James imports from Bremen for some of the Bristol sea captains because it is cheaper than extract of malt, which is a very good antiscorbutic.

    Morgan’s Run

  • But the trouble with sour crout is that sailors loathe it and have to be flogged to eat it.

    Morgan’s Run

  • There is a pickled cabbage called ‘sour crout’ my cousin James imports from Bremen for some of the Bristol sea captains because it is cheaper than extract of malt, which is a very good antiscorbutic.

    Morgan’s Run

  • He thereupon opened the door, received and entertained me with all the hospitality his poverty would admit of; regaled me with sour crout and some new laid eggs, the only provision he had, and clean straw with a kind of rug for a bed, he having no other for himself and wife.

    Life in the Grey Nunnery at Montreal

  • [Footnote 37: French pronunciation of sour-crout.] "I suppose you entertain a good many wishes in regard to your birthday?" asked the king, putting more cabbage on his own plate.

    Napoleon and the Queen of Prussia

  • Sour-crout was much more to his taste as a preventive of scurvy, and in 1777, at the request of

    The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore

  • Germany, where the idea came from, and may it be stuffed into a barrel of sour-crout, not to come out till it is thoroughly rotted.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846

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