Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A thin mortar used to fill cracks and crevices in masonry.
  • noun A thin plaster for finishing walls and ceilings.
  • noun Chiefly British Sediment; lees.
  • transitive verb To fill or finish with a thin mortar or plaster.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A thin coarse mortar poured into the joints of masonry and brickwork.
  • noun A finishing or setting coat of fine stuff for ceilings.
  • Made with or consisting of grout.
  • noun Coarse meal; pollard; in the plural, groats; also, porridge made of such meal.
  • noun Wort when first prepared, and before it has begun to ferment.
  • noun Lees; grounds; dregs.
  • noun Mud; dirt; filth.
  • To fill up or form with grout, as the joints or spaces between stones; use as grout.
  • A dialectal form of great, seen in composition, as in grouthead, groutnoll.
  • To bore with the snout, or dig up like a hog.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • transitive verb To fill up or finish with grout, as the joints between stones.
  • noun Coarse meal; ground malt
  • noun engraving Formerly, a kind of beer or ale.
  • noun engraving Lees; dregs; grounds.
  • noun A thin, coarse mortar, used for pouring into the joints of masonry and brickwork; also, a finer material, used in finishing the best ceilings.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A thin mortar used to fill the gaps between tiles and cavities in masonry.
  • noun Coarse meal; groats.
  • noun (typically used in the plural) Dregs, sediment.
  • verb To insert mortar between tiles.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb bind with grout
  • noun a thin mortar that can be poured and used to fill cracks in masonry or brickwork

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, grain used for making malt, mud, from Old English grūt, coarse meal.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From obsolete grewt, grut ("dirt, soul"), from Middle English grut, from Old English grūt ("dregs; coarse meal"), from Proto-Germanic *grūtan (compare Dutch gruit ("dregs"), German Grauß, Norwegian grut ("ground")), lengthening of Proto-Germanic *grutan.

Examples

Comments

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  • Least favorite word. Grout.

    December 3, 2006

  • Better'n gout!

    June 19, 2007

  • Which is coarser grit, groat, or grout? Cf. discussions @ cheese grits.

    September 20, 2009