Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun A long journey to a foreign or distant place, especially by sea.
  • noun The events of a journey of exploration or discovery considered as material for a narrative.
  • noun Such a narrative.
  • intransitive verb To make a voyage.
  • intransitive verb To sail across; traverse.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Formerly, a passage or journey by land or by sea; now only a journey or passage by sea or water from one place, port, or country to another, especially a passing or journey by water to a distant place or country: as, a voyage to India.
  • noun plural A book of voyages: used like travels.
  • noun The practice of traveling.
  • noun A way or course taken; an attempt or undertaking; an enterprise; an expedition.
  • noun = Syn. 1. Trip, Excursion, etc. (see journey), cruise, sail.
  • To take a journey or voyage; especially, to sail or pass by water.
  • To travel; pass over; traverse.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb To take a voyage; especially, to sail or pass by water.
  • noun Formerly, a passage either by sea or land; a journey, in general; but not chiefly limited to a passing by sea or water from one place, port, or country, to another; especially, a passing or journey by water to a distant place or country.
  • noun obsolete The act or practice of traveling.
  • noun obsolete Course; way.
  • transitive verb To travel; to pass over; to traverse.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A long journey; especially by ship.
  • verb To go on a long journey.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun an act of traveling by water
  • noun a journey to some distant place
  • verb travel on water propelled by wind or by other means

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old French veyage, from Late Latin viāticum, a journey, from Latin, provisions for a journey, from neuter of viāticus, of a journey, from via, road; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Middle English viage, from Anglo-Norman viage, from Old French voiage, from Latin viaticum. The modern spelling is under the influence of Modern French voyage.

Examples

  • _A letter addressed to the Town Council of Seville by Dr. Chanca, a native of that city, and physician to the fleet of Columbus, on his second voyage to the Indies, describing the principal events which occurred during that voyage_

    The Northmen, Columbus and Cabot, 985-1503

  • But don't think the voyage is as important, maybe a little bit but not as of now.

    Obama committed to going to climate summit

  • Kuper said the voyage is a "symbolic statement" intended to show that not all Jews support Israeli policies toward Palestinians and to underscore what he called Israel's "illegal, unnecessary and inhumane" blockade of Gaza.

    Jewish Activists Attempting To Breach Israel's Gaza Blockade

  • I don't really think they are very deadly, and I know our extemporized fuses are slower than our voyage is at the present time; but nevertheless the bombs have served the purpose, as you shall see.

    CHAPTER XLVII

  • Kuper said the voyage is a "symbolic statement" intended to show that not all Jews support Israeli policies toward Palestinians and to underscore what he called Israel's "illegal, unnecessary and inhumane" blockade of Gaza.

    Jewish Activists Attempting To Breach Israel's Gaza Blockade

  • The crux of the voyage is a turn from inward focus to an outward sense of adventure.

    Whatever Happened to Psychology Today? (The Boomer Blog)

  • I don't really think they are very deadly, and I know our extemporized fuses are slower than our voyage is at the present time; but nevertheless the bombs have served the purpose, as you shall see.

    Chapter 47

  • A long sea voyage is the worst possible preparation for long and fatiguing marches.

    The Autobiography of Liuetenant-General Sir Harry Smith, Baronet of Aliwal on the Sutlej, G. C. B.

  • From this moment the prosperity of our voyage is assured.

    A Thousand Miles Up the Nile

  • I might have been provoked to one great execration by what I hear from Bristol, if I had not hex brought up all my bile upon the voyage & remained pigeon-livered ever since. a sea voyage is the best way in the world to learn Xtian meekness. the gall comes out by mouthfuls & you have not bitterness enough left to be angry with a rascal

    Letter 147

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