Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To journey; travel, especially on foot: now only in the present participle or the verbal noun.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun obsolete The act of journeying; travel; passage.
  • intransitive verb obsolete To journey; to travel; to go to and fro.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun archaic Travel, journeying.
  • verb intransitive, archaic To travel; make a journey.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English weyfaren, originally in participle form weyfarand, from Old English weġfarende ("wayfaring"), equivalent to way +‎ faring. Cognate with Danish vejfarende ("wayfaring"), Swedish vägfarande, Icelandic vegfarandi ("wayfaring"). More at way, fare.

Examples

  • So he turned in the direction of their wayfare and scenting the breeze which blew from their quarter, chanted these improvised lines,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • We went forth privily in disguise and fared on and ceased not our wayfare the rest of that day and all its night, till nigh upon morning, when we unloaded and, hobbling our camels, lay down to sleep.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Abbaside Caliphs, unknowing what had passed during his wayfare.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • They made all haste over their wayfare, till they reached

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • When, however, the brothers met, the elder could not but see the change of complexion in the younger and questioned him of his case whereto he replied, “Tis caused by the travails of wayfare and my case needs care, for I have suffered from the change of water and air! but Allah be praised for reuniting me with a brother so dear and so rare!”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • By Allah the Omnipotent, O my lord, I have taken a loathing to wayfare, and when I hear the words ‘Voyage’ or

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • On the last day he invited the Fakirs, the poor and the needy, far and near, and they flocked in troops and ate, whilst the merchant sat, with his son by his side. 448 And among the paupers, behold, entered Shaykh Obayd the jeweller and he was naked and weary and bare on his face the marks of wayfare.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • And after reaching the Islands and entering the city they took up their lodging in a khan, where they rested three days from the fatigues of their wayfare; after which

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Through all its years, Three Chimneys had been a wayfare, a tavern for travelers to stop and find a good meal, perhaps a bed for the night in the common room or the barn.

    The Lioness

  • On the fourth day he made ready for wayfare and got together sumptuous presents befitting his elder brother's majesty, and stablished his chief Wazir Viceroy of the land during his absence.

    Tehran Winter

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