Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To wander or drift about.
  • intransitive verb To ramble; digress.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To wander about, as from place to place or from subject to subject; stray; digress.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb intransitive to stray off from a subject, focus, or course

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb lose clarity or turn aside especially from the main subject of attention or course of argument in writing, thinking, or speaking

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Late Latin dīvagārī, dīvagāt- : Latin dī-, dis-, apart; see dis– + Latin vagārī, to wander (from vagus, wandering).]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin dis- ("in different direction") + vagatus, past participle of vago ("wander, ramble")

Examples

  • But if you're planning to be at Dragonmeet, in addition to doing proper obeisance to the mighty robin_d_laws, and buying a Rare Preprint of our new Trail of Cthulhu adventure book, Shadows Over Filmland, and watching us divagate on GMing Tips and Investigative Game Design in seminars, and playing wonderful other games run by wonderful other people, ask me about Iowa State A&M.

    Kenneth Hite's Journal

  • Thence to the "40 Years of GenCon: The Attendees" panel, at which Robin asked me to divagate, in my role as comparative smellologist, on the smells of Milwaukee vs.

    Kenneth Hite's Journal

  • Allow me to briefly divagate here on the nonexistence of abortion as an option in Knocked Up.

    Feministing: June 2007 Archives

  • But when they had sat down, Julius was little inclined to divagate into an account of his travels.

    Master of His Fate

  • So does a child's balloon divagate upon the currents of the air, and touch and slide off again from every obstacle.

    A Book of English Prose Part II, Arranged for Secondary and High Schools

  • It would be of interest to divagate from literature to politics and inquire to what extent Romanticism is incorporate in Imperialism; to inquire to what extent Romanticism has possessed the imagination of Imperialists, and to what extent it was made use of by Disraeli.

    Imperfect Critics

  • So does a child's balloon divagate upon the currents of the air, and touch, and slide off again from every obstacle.

    Across the Plains: With Other Memories and Essays

  • 'But I divagate (I perceive in a thousand ways that I grow old).

    Merry Men

  • "Sub-divagate" would be more appropriate since by most definitions, a Diva must actually have a modicum of fame or talent.

    HumidCity

  • My rationale for preparing so detailed a schema rests on (a) my proclivity to divagate and lose focus, (2) the high valuation I put on transitions and continuity, and (iii) the importance of strong, clear, explicit thesis sentences for an audience to orient itself.

    Akma

Comments

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  • tennessee williams says in the new york review of books that his divagation may have been an asset.

    December 14, 2007

  • A controversy among divas.

    May 11, 2008

  • JM will never divagate from his digressions nor digress from his divagations.

    September 27, 2010