Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • transitive verb To blow (a wind instrument).
  • transitive verb To sound by blowing.
  • intransitive verb To wrap (something) around a center or another object once or repeatedly.
  • intransitive verb To wrap or encircle (an object) in a series of coils; entwine.
  • intransitive verb To go along (a curving or twisting course).
  • intransitive verb To proceed on (one's way) with a curving or twisting course.
  • intransitive verb To introduce in a disguised or devious manner; insinuate.
  • intransitive verb To turn (a crank, for example) in a series of circular motions.
  • intransitive verb To coil the spring of (a mechanism) by turning a stem or cord, for example.
  • intransitive verb To coil (thread, for example), as onto a spool or into a ball.
  • intransitive verb To remove or unwind (thread, for example), as from a spool.
  • intransitive verb To lift or haul by means of a windlass or winch.
  • intransitive verb To move in or have a curving or twisting course.
  • intransitive verb To move in or have a spiral or circular course.
  • intransitive verb To be coiled or spiraled.
  • intransitive verb To be twisted or whorled into curved forms.
  • intransitive verb To proceed misleadingly or insidiously in discourse or conduct.
  • intransitive verb To become wound.
  • noun The act of winding.
  • noun A single turn, twist, or curve.
  • noun Moving air, especially a natural and perceptible movement of air parallel to or along the ground.
  • noun A movement of air generated artificially, as by bellows or a fan.
  • noun The direction from which a movement of air comes.
  • noun A movement of air coming from one of the four cardinal points of the compass.
  • noun Moving air carrying sound, an odor, or a scent.
  • noun Breath, especially normal or adequate breathing; respiration.
  • noun Gas produced in the stomach or intestines during digestion; flatulence.
  • noun The brass and woodwinds sections of a band or orchestra.
  • noun Wind instruments or their players considered as a group.
  • noun Woodwinds.
  • noun Something that disrupts or destroys.
  • noun A tendency; a trend.
  • noun Information, especially of something concealed; intimation.
  • noun Speech or writing empty of meaning; verbiage.
  • noun Vain self-importance; pomposity.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[From wind.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English winden, from Old English windan.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English, from Old English; see wē- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English, from Old English wind ("wind"), from Proto-Germanic *windaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéh₁n̥ts (“blowing”), present participle of *h₂weh₁- (“to blow”). Cognate with Dutch wind, German Wind, West Frisian wyn, Swedish vind, Latin ventus, Welsh gwynt, perhaps Albanian bundë ("strong damp wind"); ultimately probably cognate with weather.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English windan, from which also wend.

Examples

  • _He stayeth His rough wind in the day of the east wind_.

    Daily Strength for Daily Needs

  • Snow is falling and the wind is howling, as Washington and Knox stand together near the boat landing -- (_wind and murmur of crowd with occasional sharp commands in background through this scene.

    Washington Crossing the Delaware

  • I now asked the Lord for two things, viz.: "That He would be pleased to change the _north wind into a south wind_, and that he would give the workmen a mind to work.

    The Wonders of Prayer A Record of Well Authenticated and Wonderful Answers to Prayer

  • In the Old Testament the word wind is used many times to describe “things of no value” being tossed out in the current of air.

    Babes with a Beatitude

  • One of the things they point out is that the term wind farm is deceptive ... they're large-scale industrial facilities and need to be treated as such.

    RoguePundit

  • One of the things they point out is that the term wind farm is deceptive ... they're large-scale industrial facilities and need to be treated as such.

    RoguePundit

  • One of the things they point out is that the term wind farm is deceptive ... they're large-scale industrial facilities and need to be treated as such.

    RoguePundit

  • One of the things they point out is that the term wind farm is deceptive ... they're large-scale industrial facilities and need to be treated as such.

    RoguePundit

  • One of the things they point out is that the term wind farm is deceptive ... they're large-scale industrial facilities and need to be treated as such.

    RoguePundit

  • One of the things they point out is that the term wind farm is deceptive ... they're large-scale industrial facilities and need to be treated as such.

    RoguePundit

Comments

New comments are temporarily disabled while we update our database.

  • Strong.

    September 7, 2009

  • A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing. --from the definitions.

    January 17, 2013

  • Wind - rimes with dimmed wind rimes with kind. Why is it so difficult to get these two words properly separated in the dictionary.

    December 12, 2014 ⋅ delete ⋅ edit

    December 12, 2014