Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To utter without thinking; blurt.
  • transitive v. To sound or produce harshly or raucously: trombones blatting out a tune.
  • intransitive v. To cry, especially like a sheep; bleat.
  • intransitive v. To make a harsh or raucous noise.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To cry, as a calf or sheep; to bleat; to make a senseless noise; to talk inconsiderately.
  • v. To produce an overrich or overblown sound on a brass instrument such as a trumpet, trombone, or tuba.
  • n. Connections; relationships; one's social or business network.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To cry, as a calf or sheep; to bleat; to make a senseless noise; to talk inconsiderately.
  • transitive v. To utter inconsiderately.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To utter heedlessly; blurt out: as, he blatted the news.
  • To talk inconsiderately or nonsensically; blather.
  • To bleat.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. cry plaintively

Etymologies

Imitative.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Imitative, first attested 1846 (Wiktionary)
Russian блат, from Polish blat ("cover, umbrella") or Yiddish בלאַט ("leaf, list") (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Good spot.

    Nice visuals too.

    September 24, 2011

  • Many Scandinavian and Dutch language newspaper names end(ed) in -blad. Along the lines of German Blatt, leaf. In this case, as in a leaf of paper, I should think.

    September 24, 2011

  • Used by Damon Runyan in 1932 to mean newspaper.
    "In fact, there is some mention of it in the blats."
    - D. Runyan, 'Collier's' 21 Aug. 32/2.

    September 24, 2011