Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • intransitive verb To utter without thinking; blurt.
  • intransitive verb To sound or produce harshly or raucously.
  • intransitive verb To cry, especially like a sheep; bleat.
  • intransitive verb To make a harsh or raucous noise.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To utter heedlessly; blurt out: as, he blatted the news.
  • To talk inconsiderately or nonsensically; blather.
  • To bleat.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • intransitive verb Low To cry, as a calf or sheep; to bleat; to make a senseless noise; to talk inconsiderately.
  • transitive verb Low To utter inconsiderately.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb To cry, as a calf or sheep; to bleat; to make a senseless noise; to talk inconsiderately.
  • verb To produce an overrich or overblown sound on a brass instrument such as a trumpet, trombone, or tuba.
  • noun Connections; relationships; one's social or business network.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • verb cry plaintively

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Imitative.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Imitative, first attested 1846

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Russian блат, from Polish blat ("cover, umbrella") or Yiddish בלאַט ("leaf, list")

Examples

Comments

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  • Used by Damon Runyan in 1932 to mean newspaper.

    "In fact, there is some mention of it in the blats."

    - D. Runyan, 'Collier's' 21 Aug. 32/2.

    September 24, 2011

  • Many Scandinavian and Dutch language newspaper names end(ed) in -blad. Along the lines of German Blatt, leaf. In this case, as in a leaf of paper, I should think.

    September 24, 2011

  • Good spot.

    Nice visuals too.

    September 24, 2011