Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A very strong gust of wind or air.
  • n. The effect of such a gust.
  • n. A forcible stream of air, gas, or steam from an opening, especially one in a blast furnace to aid combustion.
  • n. A sudden loud sound, especially one produced by a stream of forced air: a piercing blast from the steam whistle.
  • n. The act of producing such a sound: gave a blast on his trumpet.
  • n. A violent explosion, as of dynamite or a bomb.
  • n. The violent effect of such an explosion, consisting of a wave of increased atmospheric pressure followed immediately by a wave of decreased pressure.
  • n. An explosive charge.
  • n. Botany Any of several plant diseases of diverse causes, resulting in sudden death of buds, flowers, foliage, or young fruits.
  • n. A destructive or damaging influence.
  • n. A powerful hit, blow, or shot.
  • n. A violent verbal assault or outburst: The candidate leveled a blast at her opponent.
  • n. Slang A highly exciting or pleasurable experience or event, such as a big party.
  • transitive v. To knock down or shatter by or as if by explosion; smash.
  • transitive v. To play or sound loudly: The referees blasted their whistles.
  • transitive v. To hit with great force: The batter blasted the ball to right field.
  • transitive v. To kill or destroy by hitting or shooting.
  • transitive v. To have a harmful or destructive effect on.
  • transitive v. To cause to shrivel, wither, or mature imperfectly by or as if by blast or blight: crops that were blasted by frost.
  • transitive v. To make or open by or as if by explosion: blast a tunnel through the mountains.
  • transitive v. To criticize or attack vigorously.
  • intransitive v. To use or detonate explosives.
  • intransitive v. To emit a loud, intense sound; blare: speakers blasting at full volume.
  • intransitive v. To wither or shrivel or mature imperfectly.
  • intransitive v. To criticize or attack with vigor.
  • intransitive v. To shoot.
  • intransitive v. Electronics To distort sound recording or transmission by overloading a microphone or loudspeaker.
  • blast off To take off, as a rocket.
  • idiom full blast At full speed, volume, or capacity: turned the radio up full blast.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A violent gust of wind.
  • n. A forcible stream of air from an orifice, as from a bellows, the mouth, etc. Hence: The continuous blowing to which one charge of ore or metal is subjected in a furnace; as, to melt so many tons of iron at a blast.
  • n. An explosion.
  • n. A loud, sudden sound.
  • n. A good time; an enjoyable moment.
  • v. To make a loud noise.
  • v. To shatter, as if by an explosion.
  • v. To open up a hole in, usually by means of a sudden and imprecise method (such as an explosion).
  • v. To curse; to damn.
  • v. (sci-fi) To shoot, especially with an energy weapon (as opposed to one which fires projectiles).
  • v. To shoot; kick the ball in hope of scoring a goal.
  • v. To criticize or reprimand severely; to verbally discipline or punish.
  • v. To blight or wither.
  • v. To be blighted or withered.
  • v. To blow, as on a trumpet.
  • interj. Blast it; damn it.
  • n. An immature or undifferentiated cell (e.g., lymphoblast, myeloblast).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A violent gust of wind.
  • n. A forcible stream of air from an orifice, as from a bellows, the mouth, etc. Hence: The continuous blowing to which one charge of ore or metal is subjected in a furnace.
  • n. The exhaust steam from and engine, driving a column of air out of a boiler chimney, and thus creating an intense draught through the fire; also, any draught produced by the blast.
  • n. The sound made by blowing a wind instrument; strictly, the sound produces at one breath.
  • n. A sudden, pernicious effect, as if by a noxious wind, especially on animals and plants; a blight.
  • n. The act of rending, or attempting to rend, heavy masses of rock, earth, etc., by the explosion of gunpowder, dynamite, etc.; also, the charge used for this purpose.
  • n. A flatulent disease of sheep.
  • transitive v. To injure, as by a noxious wind; to cause to wither; to stop or check the growth of, and prevent from fruit-bearing, by some pernicious influence; to blight; to shrivel.
  • transitive v. Hence, to affect with some sudden violence, plague, calamity, or blighting influence, which destroys or causes to fail; to visit with a curse; to curse; to ruin.
  • transitive v. To confound by a loud blast or din.
  • transitive v. To rend open by any explosive agent, as gunpowder, dynamite, etc.; to shatter.
  • intransitive v. To be blighted or withered.
  • intransitive v. To blow; to blow on a trumpet.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A subtle kind of matter supposed by Van Helmont, a Dutch mystic philosopher, to be radiated from the stars and to produce effects opposite to those of heat.
  • n. A blowing; a gust or puff of wind; especially, a strong and sudden gust.
  • n. A forcible stream of air from the mouth, from bellows, or the like.
  • n. Hence A jet of exhaust-steam thrown into a smoke-stack to assist the draft.
  • n. In metallurgy, the air forced into a furnace for the purpose of accelerating combustion. A furnace is said to be in blast when it is in operation, out of blast when stopped, either temporarily or permanently.
  • n. The sound made by blowing a wind-instrument, as a horn or trumpet; strictly, the sound produced by one breath.
  • n. Any sudden, pernicious, or destructive influence upon animals or plants; the infection of anything pestilential; a blight.
  • n. Hence—7. Any withering or destructive influence; a curse.
  • n. The product of a blast or blight; a bud which never blossoms.
  • n. The charge of gunpowder or other explosive used at one firing in blasting operations.
  • n. The explosion of inflammable air in a mine.
  • n. A flatulent disease in sheep.
  • n. A smoke of tobacco.
  • n. Synonyms Gust, etc. See wind, n.
  • To blow; puff; breathe hard; pant.
  • To smoke tobacco.
  • To boast; brag; speak ostentatiously.
  • To wither; be blighted.
  • To burst as by an explosion; blow up.
  • To blow forth or abroad; hence, to utter loudly; proclaim.
  • To break or tear to pieces (rocks or similar materials) by the agency of gunpowder or other explosive.
  • To confound or stun by a loud blast or din; split; burst.
  • To blow or breathe on so as to injure, as a sudden gust or destructive wind; cause to fade, shrivel, or wither; check the growth of and prevent from coming to maturity and producing fruit; blight, as trees or plants.
  • To blight or cause to come to nothing, as by some pernicious influence; bring destruction, calamity, or infamy upon; ruin: as, to blast pride, hopes, reputation, happiness.
  • To curse; strike with the wrath of heaven.
  • See blasto-.
  • n. In mining, a fall of water down a mine-shaft designed to produce or quicken ventilation.
  • n. In the West Indies, a disease of the sugar-cane, probably caused by an acarid now known as the sugar-cane mite. The species is still unde-scribed.
  • n. In zoology, one of the spindle-shaped, spore-like bodies in the life-cycle of certain Sporozoa, such as the malarial parasite.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make with or as if with an explosion
  • n. a very long fly ball
  • n. a sudden very loud noise
  • v. shrivel or wither or mature imperfectly
  • v. create by using explosives
  • v. criticize harshly or violently
  • n. intense adverse criticism
  • v. apply a draft or strong wind to to
  • v. shatter as if by explosion
  • v. use explosives on
  • v. fire a shot
  • v. hit hard
  • n. a highly pleasurable or exciting experience
  • v. make a strident sound
  • n. a strong current of air
  • n. an explosion (as of dynamite)

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English blǣst.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English blast from Old English blǣst ("blowing, blast"). More at blow. (Wiktionary)
From Ancient Greek βλαστός (blastos, "germ or sprout"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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