Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun Archaic Relish; gusto.
  • noun The sense of taste.
  • noun Personal taste or inclination; liking.
  • noun A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
  • noun A sudden burst, as of rain or smoke.
  • noun An outburst of emotion.
  • intransitive verb To blow in gusts.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • To taste; enjoy the taste of; have a relish for.
  • noun The sense or pleasure of tasting; relish; gusto.
  • noun Gratification of any kind, especially that which is sensual; pleasure; enjoyment.
  • noun Turn of fancy; intellectual taste.
  • noun A sudden squall or blast of wind; a sudden rushing or driving of the wind, of short duration.
  • noun A sudden outburst, as of passionate feeling.
  • noun Synonyms Squall, etc. See wind, n.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun A sudden squall; a violent blast of wind; a sudden and brief rushing or driving of the wind.
  • noun A sudden violent burst of passion.
  • noun The sense or pleasure of tasting; relish; gusto.
  • noun Gratification of any kind, particularly that which is exquisitely relished; enjoyment.
  • noun Intellectual taste; fancy.
  • transitive verb obsolete To taste; to have a relish for.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
  • noun Any rush or outburst (of water, emotion etc.).
  • verb intransitive To blow in gusts.
  • noun archaic The physiological faculty of taste.
  • noun Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
  • verb obsolete, transitive To taste.
  • verb obsolete, transitive To have a relish for.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun a strong current of air

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Middle English guste, taste, from Latin gustus; see gusto.]

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

[Probably from Old Norse gustr; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Apparently from Old Norse gustr, though not recorded before Shakespeare.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin gustus ‘taste’. For the verb, compare Latin gustare, Italian gustare, Spanish gustar.

Examples

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