Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A severe tropical cyclone originating in the equatorial regions of the Atlantic Ocean or Caribbean Sea or eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean, traveling north, northwest, or northeast from its point of origin, and usually involving heavy rains.
  • n. A wind with a speed greater than 74 miles (119 kilometers) per hour, according to the Beaufort scale.
  • n. Something resembling a hurricane in force or speed.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A severe tropical cyclone in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, or in the eastern North Pacific off the west coast of Mexico, with winds of 75 miles per hour (120.7 kph) or greater accompanied by rain, lightning, and thunder that sometimes moves into temperate latitudes.
  • n. a wind scale for quite strong wind, stronger than a storm
  • n. "full—triple-full—full" – an acrobatic maneuver consisting of three flips and five twists, with one twist on the first flip, three twists on the second flip, one twist on the third flip

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A violent storm, characterized by extreme fury and sudden changes of the wind, and generally accompanied by rain, thunder, and lightning; -- especially prevalent in the East and West Indies. Also used figuratively.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A storm of the intensest severity; a cyclone.
  • n. Any violent tempest, or anything suggestive of one.
  • n. In the eighteenth century, a social party; a rout; a drum.
  • n. Synonyms Tempest, etc. See wind.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)

Etymologies

Spanish huracán, from Taino hurákan; akin to Arawak kulakani, thunder.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Spanish huracán, ultimately from the name of the Taino storm god Juracán whom the Taínos believed dwelled on El Yunque mountain and, when he was upset, sent the strong winds and rain upon them. (Wiktionary)
Coined by Jeret Peterson (Wiktionary)

Examples

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