Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Something owned; a possession.
  • n. A piece of real estate: has a swimming pool on the property.
  • n. Something tangible or intangible to which its owner has legal title: properties such as copyrights and trademarks.
  • n. Possessions considered as a group.
  • n. The right of ownership; title.
  • n. An article, except costumes and scenery, that appears on the stage or on screen during a dramatic performance.
  • n. A characteristic trait or peculiarity, especially one serving to define or describe its possessor.
  • n. A characteristic attribute possessed by all members of a class. See Synonyms at quality.
  • n. A special capability or power; a virtue: the chemical properties of a metal.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Something that is owned.
  • n. A piece of real estate, such as a parcel of land.
  • n. real estate; the business of selling houses.
  • n. The exclusive right of possessing, enjoying and disposing of a thing.
  • n. An attribute or abstract quality associated with an individual, object or concept.
  • n. An attribute or abstract quality which is characteristic of a class of objects.
  • n. An editable or read-only parameter associated with an application, component or class, or the value of such a parameter.
  • n. An object used in a dramatic production
  • v. To invest with properties, or qualities.
  • v. To make a property of; to appropriate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. That which is proper to anything; a peculiar quality of a thing; that which is inherent in a subject, or naturally essential to it; an attribute.
  • n. An acquired or artificial quality; that which is given by art, or bestowed by man.
  • n. The exclusive right of possessing, enjoying, and disposing of a thing; ownership; title.
  • n. That to which a person has a legal title, whether in his possession or not; thing owned; an estate, whether in lands, goods, or money.
  • n. All the adjuncts of a play except the scenery and the dresses of the actors; stage requisites.
  • n. Propriety; correctness.
  • transitive v. To invest which properties, or qualities.
  • transitive v. To make a property of; to appropriate.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Any character always present in an individual or a class; an essential attribute; a peculiar quality; loosely, any quality or characteristic.
  • n. In logic, a character which belongs to the whole of a species, and to nothing else, but not to the essence or definition.
  • n. The right to the use or enjoyment or the beneficial right of disposal of anything that can be the subject of ownership; ownership; estate; especially, ownership of tangible things.
  • n. A thing or things subject to ownership; anything that may be exclusively possessed and enjoyed; chattels and land; possessions.
  • n. A thing required for some peculiar or specific use, as a tool; an accessory; specifically, in theaters, a stage requisite, as any article of costume or furniture, or other appointment, necessary to be produced in a scene (in this specific sense used also attributively).
  • n. Propriety.
  • n. Individuality; that which constitutes an individual.
  • n. A cloak or disguise.
  • n. See the adjectives.
  • n. Such right as a bailee has in the chattel transferred to him by the bailment.
  • n. Synonyms Attribute, Characteristic, etc. See quality.
  • n. Property, Effects, Chattels, Goods, Wares, Commodities, Merchandise, possessions, wealth. Property is the general word for those material things which are one's own, whether for sale or not. Effects applies to personal property, viewed as including the things even of least value. Chattels comprises every kind of property except freehold. (See the definitions of the classes real and personal, under chattel.) Goods includes a merchant's stock-in-trade, or one's movable property of any sort. Wares are manufactured articles, especially of the heavier sort, as earthenware, wooden-ware. Commodities are such movable articles as are necessities of life, and have a money value. Merchandise is the general word for articles of trade.
  • To invest with (certain) properties or qualities.
  • To make a property or tool of; appropriate.
  • n. Specifically, in old English law, chattels as distinguished from ‘estate’ (lands).

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone
  • n. any area set aside for a particular purpose
  • n. a basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class
  • n. a construct whereby objects or individuals can be distinguished
  • n. any movable articles or objects used on the set of a play or movie

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French propriete, from Latin proprietās, ownership (translation of Greek idiotēs), from proprius, one's own; see per1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English /Anglo-Norman proprete, from Middle French propreté, from Old French propriete (modern propriété), itself, from Latin proprietas, from proprius 'own'. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I could equally have labeled this usage as property' or property* or property1, but that's even clunkier.

    Arrrrrrrrrrrrr

  • ACTS constitute protection; and is that public sentiment which makes the slave 'property,' and perpetrates hourly robbery and batteries upon him, so penetrated with a sense of the sacredness of his right to life, that it will protect it at all hazards, and drag to the gallows his OWNER, if he take the life of his own _property_?

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Part 3 of 4

  • District of Columbia -- if Congress has a right to annihilate property in the District when the public safety requires it, it may surely annihilate its existence _as_ property when the public safety requires it, especially if it transform into a _protection_ and _defence_ that which as _property_ perilled the public interests.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Whether the servant died under the master's hand, or after a day or two, he was _equally_ his property, and the objector admits that in the _first_ case the master is to be "surely punished" for destroying _his own property_!

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Whether the servant died under the master's hand, or continued a day or two, he was _equally_ his master's property, and the objector admits that in the _first_ case the master is to be "surely punished" for destroying _his own property_!

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Why punish with death for stealing a very little of _that_ sort of property, and make a mere fine the penalty for stealing a thousand times as much, of any other sort of property -- especially if by his own act, God had annihilated the difference between man and _property_, by putting him on a level with it?

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Instead of _taking_ "private property," Congress, by abolishing slavery, would say "_private property_ shall not be taken; and those who have been robbed of it already, shall be kept out of it no longer; and every man's right to his own body shall be protected."

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • District of Columbia -- if Congress has a right to annihilate property in the District when the public safety requires it, it may surely annihilate its existence _as_ property when public safety requires it, especially if it transform into a _protection_ and _defence_ that which as _property_ periled the public interests.

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Why did he punish with death for stealing a very little of _that_ sort of property, and make a mere fine, the penalty for stealing a thousand times as much, of any other sort of property -- especially if God did by his own act annihilate the difference between man and _property, _ by putting him on a level with it?

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

  • Why did he punish with _death_ for stealing a very little, perhaps not a sixpence worth, of _that_ sort of property, and make a mere _fine_, the penalty for stealing a thousand times as much, of any other sort of property -- especially if God did by his own act annihilate the difference between man and _property_, by putting him

    The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus

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